Millennials Plan to Do Well By Doing Good

May 30, 2012

The Rutgers Center for Workplace Development has realeased What Workers Want in 2012,   a survey that canvassed 1,726 adults of various ages for information about their life priorities. The results show some interesting attitudinal differences among four generational groups:

  • Boomers
  • Gen X
  • Millennials
  • College students

Source: NYX's Economix blog

 

Summary descriptions from the report:

Baby Boomers

Defined as those between 49 and 65 at the time of the survey, they now make up the oldest cohort of the workforce. This group was parented by prosperity, and shares a presumption of entitlement to their world view. The Boomer cohort has always been big enough to force the culture to adapt to them. For years they have dictated politics and culture by their sheer number in a market-driven economy, and policy to the degree they have had a coherent outlook.

Generation X

Comprises those between 33 and 48, at the time of the survey. This group’s formative experiences were framed by familial and financial insecurity. They grew up amidst rising rates of divorce and recession. Where the sexual revolution of the Boomers
brought free expression and experimentation, the threat of AIDS brought Xers fear and caution. 

Millennials

Defined as those between 21 and 32 in this study, they are much more like Boomers than Xers. They grew up as an affirmed generation, with a re-focus on the family, and are generally thought of as having high self-esteem and self-confidence. They are racially and ethnically diverse and tolerant of a variety of lifestyles. Information has always been virtually costless and universally available to them. 

My observations:

1. Millennials value marriage or life partnership far more than any other group, including Boomers. Perhaps due to a declining divorce rate as they came of age, they lack the cynicism of Gen X about relationships.

2. The exact same pattern among groups holds for the life goal of having children, with 65% of Millennials viewing it as essential or very important.

3. Millennials place a high priority of having a job that makes the world a better place. For an excellent essay on this sentiment, see Even Artichokes Have Doubts. 

Note: The piece was written by Marina Keegan, a young woman who was tragically killed over the weekend in a car accident on Cape Cod. She was 22, and had graduated from Yale just days ago. When she wrote the piece last fall challenging her college classmates to eschew finance and consulting for more valuable and meaningful work, the article was picked up by the New York Times, NPR and other media outlets. Keegan’s most recent (and heartbreaking) essay can be found here. Her parents have said they feel comforted by the fact that it has gone viral.

4. The Milennials also value leadership, wealth and prestige more than any other generation. Whether they’re optimistic or foolish, they intend to have it all. It will be particularly interesting to watch this generation balance work and family. 

  • Ramble

    Millennials value marriage or life partnership far more than any other group, including Boomers.

    The group that is at the age where you are most likely to get married is the most interested in it.

    In other news, 5 year olds are most interested in Dora the Explorer.

  • Ramble

    You will also notice that the group with the most money is the least concerned about it.

    Reminds me of that scene in The Aviator where Katherine Hepburns family declares that they are socialists and that they don’t care about money.

    • This is how the question was worded:

      Different people have different goals in life. Please indicate how important each of the following is
      to your overall happiness.

      If anything, this should skew answers about marriage and children toward Boomers, not the reverse.

  • FeralEmployee

    As a supposed “millenial”, when I see these these statistics, I’m more inclined to throw in the term “instant gratification”, instead of optimism and motivation.

    Prestigious career? Artist, movie star… (don’t forget the aversion to STEM fields);
    Being wealthy? Money and plastic > relationships and talent;
    Leader in my community? Look at me, look at me, meeeee!

    The cynicism is still there, and a new one is becoming more prominent, that of the “failed icon”. Some pretty big names have gone down, and people feel they cannot look up at others no more. When people look up at movie stars, you think it’s because of their character or their status (money, looks, …)? Just the next generation hurled towards life, “armed” with the perception they’ll have it all because the commercials said so.

  • Rico

    “Millennials place a high priority of having a job that makes the world a better place.”

    Well, sure – everyone thinks they can change the world at 20. I don’t think that’s unique to the Millennials.

    • @Rico

      Well, sure – everyone thinks they can change the world at 20. I don’t think that’s unique to the Millennials.

      It’s true that the young are more idealistic, but the different generations do display different attitudes depending on the economic, political and social climates that were in place as they grew up. There’s been quite a bit of variation in that regard over the last three generations.

  • Brendan

    I tend to think that much of the skewing has to do with changing attitudes as people age. People tend to be much more idealistic and “world is my oyster” types in their 20s than they do later on when they are living differently in their 30s and 40s and more and more doors begin to close off. I certainly know many of my own gen X peers who were more idealistic about life when we were 23 than we are now in our mid 40s.

  • Ramble

    If anything, this should skew answers about marriage and children toward Boomers, not the reverse.

    I am not following what you are saying here.

    • @Ramble

      Most Boomers have children, so wouldn’t they be more likely to say that having children is essential or very important as a life goal? Same with having chosen marriage. If anything, they’d be prone to justify the choices they’d already made, no?

  • Erik L

    I agree with most of the above. Basically, it’s very difficult to interpret this without knowledge of how each older generation would have answered when they were in the younger brackets.

  • Escoffier

    The way this is framed is skewed. The underlying premise is that business/profits/commerce = bad whereas do-goody non-profit stuff = good. “Making a difference” is only the latter.

    Well, no, it’s not that simple. The person who starts a firm that creates 200 jobs has done more to “make a difference” than the foundation officer who simply gives away money that was earned by someone else through filthy commerce 50 or 100 years ago. This is to say nothing of the quality of the program receiving the money, which is often abysmal.

    Earning a living, contributing to the economy, forming and maintaining a stable family, raising good childern–all that is “making a difference” even if you never work a day in an NGO. The whole Davos hive mind, which defines elite discourse in the OECD, has corrupted our understanding of these basic facts, even though all the people who foot the bills at Davos are dirty capitalists.

    We cannot be a world or a nation full of foundation officers. Someone has to generate and distribute the necessities of life and they need to make a profit at it if they are going to bother to do it. In addition, there are the non-necessities that make life enjoyable for most of us (Glaucon’s relishes). Why we continue to delegitimize all this activity is beyond me. I mean, I know why but I think it’s stupid.

    • @Escoffier

      As an MBA, former consultant and SAHM who lived on the proceeds of a finance career for many years, I’m not arguing that finance or consulting have no value to society, though I won’t pretend to claim the moral high ground that a doctor can, for example.

      I think that Marina Keegan makes a good point – there is something troubling when 25% of the Yale class goes racing off to McKinsey, Bain and Wall St. I know that Harvard University has voiced similar concerns about the choices its graduates make coming out of school.

      In any case, I do believe based on my exposure to Millennials that they are quite socially conscious. They’re the ones behind Occupy, for example – the first anti-establishment effort of its kind in over 40 years. They compete very aggressively for positions in Teach for America and other community organizations. I personally know 4 young people who have already taken committed steps to spending their careers in Africa. Before now, I haven’t met a single person who made that choice.

      Thanks to digital media and technology, the world is becoming a small place.

  • “Millennials value marriage or life partnership far more than any other group, including Boomers. Perhaps due to a declining divorce rate as they came of age, they lack the cynicism of Gen X about relationships.”

    I can agree to this. Those in my age group (Millennials) that I find to be cynical about relationships also came from divorced homes and Generation X parents. I rarely find someone with this mindset due to their own thinking, it’s often passed down.

    And those I run into who didn’t grow up in shaky households tend to be more open-minded about relationships and able to differentiate between one situation and gross generalizations about the opposite sex or relationships.

    • @Rone

      And those I run into who didn’t grow up in shaky households tend to be more open-minded about relationships and able to differentiate between one situation and gross generalizations about the opposite sex or relationships.

      Research bears this out. College kids of divorce are far more likely to state that they prefer hooking up because they believe relationships take too much work and usually end badly.

  • #4 particularly pertains to me. I’m interested to see how I am going to balance work and family, and sometimes I think I might not even want kids if it means I would have to give up my career and volunteerism. I already an pretty sure I want to wait until early to mid 30s to think about having children, but I guess I cross that bridge when I get to it. Right now, there is just so much I want to do in my life that doesn’t and often even can’t involve children.

    • @Ashley

      Your mention of volunteerism reminded me of something else. Here in Boston there are now volunteer activities for singles. I believe they schedule a big work day, e.g. a Saturday at Habitat for Humanity or a shelter, and then at the end of the day they go out for beers together. I think that would be a great way of meeting new people. I’m sure other cities have this as well.

  • Abbot

    They can “want” marriage and maybe many are out there trying to get it. But that does not mean they are viewed as qualified or desirable due to a myriad of factors. Some lessons are hard learned.

  • Abbot

    “College kids of divorce are far more likely to state that they prefer hooking up ”

    And those who can hook up more easily will do it more. Best to pass them up when shopping for a spouse.

  • Escoffier

    Well, sue, given where I grew up and went to school I am cynical about “social conciousness.” I mean, OWS is basically an incoherent rabble. Teach for America is great but two things one could say about that: 1) it is EXTREMELY prestigious so the idea that these kids are really giving anything up or making a sacrifice is dubious. I mean I know it can be rough but there is a huge pot of gold at the other end and the term is not that long. TFA is basically the McKinsey of non-profits. 2) their results are mixed at best and when you start measuring for scalability and sustainability, it’s far from clear that they do any long term good.

    HYPS are extremely disingenous on this topic, BTW. yes, they do a lot of hand-wringing about how they don’t want all their grads to go to hedge funds, etc. But they also know that both their brand and their endowments depend on their grads controlling the commanding heights of the culture and economy. They are pretty happy with the mix as it is. The hand-wringing is for show. They highlight the do-goody stuff to deflect attention from the fact that all the evil banks despised by their facultly and grad students are in fact run by their former undergrads.

    • @Escoffier

      TFA is very prestigious, but part of that is how selective they are. I realize that’s a chicken or egg question, but my daughter worked for them as an undergrad, and they would rather have a school yield zero recruits than take someone with less than a 3.6 and stellar leadership credentials. The circular file is where 90% of the apps go regardless of need. So I think they masterfully created that prestige by taking only very strong graduates from the start.

      Good point about the hand wringing of prestigious institutions. They want a mix, though, for PR purposes. They don’t want all the most talented grads heading for finance.

  • Escoffier

    Susan, I have read elsewhere that Gen X is actually quite stable once married (low divorce rate) in part because they were the generation most racked by divorce among their parents. Their marriage rates are not as high as the prior generation but their divorce rate is a fraction.

    • Susan, I have read elsewhere that Gen X is actually quite stable once married (low divorce rate) in part because they were the generation most racked by divorce among their parents. Their marriage rates are not as high as the prior generation but their divorce rate is a fraction.

      That doesn’t surprise me, actually. With a greater awareness of the pitfalls, they would be better prepared to avoid them.

  • Brendan

    HYPS are extremely disingenous on this topic, BTW. yes, they do a lot of hand-wringing about how they don’t want all their grads to go to hedge funds, etc. But they also know that both their brand and their endowments depend on their grads controlling the commanding heights of the culture and economy. They are pretty happy with the mix as it is. The hand-wringing is for show. They highlight the do-goody stuff to deflect attention from the fact that all the evil banks despised by their facultly and grad students are in fact run by their former undergrads.

    This has been my experience as well. This is the public hand-wringing and the stuff of commencement speeches. In reality, they want a goodly chunk of their alums being docs, lawyers, execs, bankers, mgmt consultants, high-end entrepreneurs and the like — they want the alumni financial contributions, on the one hand, and the actual cachet and soft power that comes from their alumni being in positions of economic and, to some degree, social and political power. Ideally, they want both from their alumni, but I don’t think anyone at those schools really cares that 25% of the class ends up at elite investment banks and consulting firms — that leaves 75% of the class doing other things, which is a mix.

  • Escoffier

    BTW, a figure that sticks out for me from Liar’s Poker (1989) was that 40% of the Yale (?) class of 1986 applied to just one I-bank (First Boston).

    So, not only is this nothing new, you could say things have been quite a bit worse.

  • Cooper

    @SW #17

    Not really, because they have already accomplished those things.

    How could having children still be a very important life goal of someone 50-65?
    Surely the ones who haven’t married (or had children) would put “getting married” (or “having children”) at a higher importance than someone who has already done so.

    Like Erik L mentioned, it’s hard to tell without knowing how the older generations would have responded in when they were within the Joyner brackets.

    • @Cooper

      How could having children still be a very important life goal of someone 50-65?

      See above, they were asked how important this life goal is to their overall happiness. So a woman my age, with two children, would say “essential.” Because of course it is.

  • Jon

    I think the college students and millennials are both optimistic and a little naive. That’s a natural part of being young, so I don’t think there is necessarily anything wrong with it.

    Once they get a little more life experience, I’m sure the real world will beat that out of them.

    Look at the hippies for example. Weren’t they all about smoking pot and saving the world? Then they grew up, cut their hair, put on ties and went to work.

    Now the ex-hippie boomers’ biggest concern is having enough money to fund a comfortable retirement.

    Of course, that interpretation may just be the result of viewing the world through my cynical gen-x filter… 🙂

  • Joe

    I really recommend the book Generations by Howe and Strauss for anyone who’s interested in this.

    Those responses bring up a couple of key questions: is this really about 4 unique age-groups and their outlooks, or is this more like a (mythical) average person going through normal life stages, from youth to (ahem) old age?

    It really could be both, with those responses skewed a bit by history undulating underneath it all, affecting how “the average person” sees things.

    I’m also confused by the choice of questions. They’re obviously questions that were important to Marina Keegan, but somebody else would have chosen a different set, surely. The ones shown her, are mostly of interest to the young.Add in a question about health care and that graph would stand out.

    So that makes me wonder if anything there really tells us “What Workers Want in 2010” (which was, after all, the title of the survey).

  • Escoffier

    Susan, that’s the point. That’s Wendy Kopp’s marketing genius. She sells TFA as “sacrifice” when in fact getting accepted by TFA is as much a career-maker as getting a job at Goldman or McKinsey. Selectivity is the key to that. Just as selectivity is the key to Princeton’s prestige.

    • @Escoffier

      Wendy Kopp certainly is a marketing genius. BTW, they also are very, very hard on accepted students who decline the offer. It happens a lot, because kids applying to law and medical schools often apply to TFA. They essentially accuse those kids of treason and greed. I know one young woman who was accepted to medical school and TFA applied strong pressure to get her to defer for two years. When she explained that she hoped to have children, and that would make her over 30 at the least, they told her that perhaps she was focusing on the wrong children. !!!!!????? It’s almost cultish.

  • Escoffier

    Re: Hippies, not quite.

    This is to distinguish hippies from the New Left, the other ’60s countercultural archetype. They have tended to blend together in the popular imagination in the years since but they are in fact quite distinct.

    The hippies were first and foremost hedonistic and secondarily a pseudo-religious movement. They tried to make the hedonism spiritual and therefore respectable but that flamed out because of its incoherence and because of the fact that only a small minority were really in it for the spiritualism. Most were in it for the sex, drugs and the fact that they didn’t have to work.

    The hippies were not about saving the world. When they grew up–those that did in fact grow up–they did tend to turn to “socially concious” productive enterprises. Much of what they did in creating the organic food movement, e.g., has been very valuable if you ask me. I would say that very few of the true hippies ever put on ties. Basically, they either died young (this happened a lot but it’s mostly been crammed down the memory hole), remained wastrels on the dole forever (go visit certain NorCal towns if you doubt this) or started working in some kind of business that they could convince themselves was somehow better than ordinary commerce.

    The New Left was truly trying to change the world. Many of them are now in the universities.

  • Ramble

    I already an pretty sure I want to wait until early to mid 30s to think about having children, but I guess I cross that bridge when I get to it.

    Ashley, please remember that each year after a girl turns 26, the likelihood that she will give birth to a healthy child goes down. Unfortunately, this si something that many girls rarely take into serious consideration.

  • Escoffier

    I know that, biologically, this is true. And yet there are so many exceptions. I don’t think there is one mother at my kid’s school who gave birth to a child before turning 30. From the look of them, most were well past that and some were over 40.

  • Ramble

    Most Boomers have children, so wouldn’t they be more likely to say that having children is essential or very important as a life goal? Same with having chosen marriage. If anything, they’d be prone to justify the choices they’d already made, no?

    Look, I am not telling you what people actually do believe or what they should believe. What I am saying is this:

    According to this poll, we see,
    – People in their 20’s are most concerned about marriage.
    – People in their 20’s are most concerned about children.
    – The youngest cohort is also the most idealistic.
    – Those with the least money are the most concerned about it.
    – Those with the most money are the least concerned about it (Boomers were especially financially successful).

    I am not saying that one generation is no more idealistic than another. But, that this survey was not particularly illuminating.

  • Escoffier

    Susan, wow, that is wierd. I really think that some of the things done/said in Kopp’s name she would be a bit unnerved by. I mean, she has four kids herself!

  • Ramble

    Susan, where was you daughter placed?

    I knew one girl who taught for TFA in Louisiana and absolutely hated it. She said it was like a war zone.

    http://www.theonion.com/articles/teach-for-america-chews-up-spits-out-another-ethni,1293/

    “But listen, no one can tell you that you can’t make a difference. It’s something you have to figure out for yourself.”

    • Susan, where was you daughter placed?

      She was one of the ones who committed treason. :-/

      I have also heard very mixed stories about the experience. My son’s gf did it in Philadelphia, and it was a very challenging two years. She taught remedial algebra, and the age in her classes spanned five years. There were 4 or 5 pregnant girls in her class both years. She was threatened on several occasions and had to call the police once.

      At the end of her first year, she gave 11 Fs. The principal called her in and told her that would not do. She had to pass those kids. She refused. He pressured her further, and she said, “I work for TFA and you cannot make me change those grades.” He changed them and the kids were pushed along.

      She is the sweetest, smartest kid, but that job aged her and made her cynical.

  • Unfortunately, this si something that many girls rarely take into serious consideration.

    I agree the want children is never treated as a goal the same way “want to be a lawyer” is, so is like a vague desire but no information is gathered as how to achieve this but assumed that kids are a missing pill away. Is the same issue with Kate Bolick at 39 “finding herself single” which makes no sense if she never actually actively worked to get married, YMMV.

  • My $.02: many Millennials have not been fully indoctrinated (yet) into the magical world of trade-offs. To get the real market color, you may need a survey that imposes rather stark, unpleasant choices—“successful power career or stable marriage—which do you want?”…”partner with hot looks or partner with kind personality—choose one”…”fame and adventure or family values—which do you select”…and so on.

    Given no opportunity costs, they’ll just sign up for everything and say they want it all, which for many/most will be basically akin to saying “I’m a ticking time bomb…in ten years I will be taking horse tranquilizers to deal with my shattered life expectations.”

    This is probably partially a function of being young and optimistic, and partially a function of legit increases in narcissistic attention-whoring and a “self-confidence bubble”.

  • Escoffier

    To elaborate on what I said in #35, girls who grow up in (say) Brookline or the little suburb where I live or in most of UMC blue America–Their own mother will be over 30 and all their friends will have mothers well over 30 and sometimes over 40. They will see this as normal. What will seem odd is a 25 y/o mom because in these places, such moms basically do not exist.

    That plus parental pressure to go to college and then excell at some career combines to make this girls think that it’s normal to wait until at least 30 to even think about having kids. UMC parents want to brag that their daughter went to Yale and then to Wharton or Duke Law, clerked for the 1oth Circuit, is a Deputy Assistant to the President or SVP in Tokyo at age 28. They really don’t want to have to say to their friends, “Oh Jenny is home with her two babies.” Not until Jenny is at least 35, has the resume behind her, and a man making a boatload of cash.

    So, biologically, their clock may be ticking. But all they see is mother after mother, in their own generation and in the generation before theirs, who started their families in their mid-30s. It worked out for all of them so why not for her?

    There is no countervailing message even being voiced, much less getting through.

    • @Escoffier

      That mirrors my own experience. As a 35 yo whose kid was starting kindergarten, I was probably in the younger half of the moms group. I remember one mom who seemed like such a baby, none of us could get over it. She was 26 or so, and we all thought she was just ridiculously young to be there. By the way, she and her husband were high school sweethearts and did not go to college. She was the only young one out of about 40 moms in two classes.

      You’re right about the expectations of boomer parents – as the survey says, we’re a generation that is used to having our say and our way. I wonder how things will shift once we’ve passed on.

  • Escoffier

    Susan, one other point, the Ivies hate more than anything an acceptee who turns them down. That’s bad for the brand. That’s also what early admission is all about, to cut down that %. They want you to commit first: You say yes to us, and if we say yes to you, you must come here. Their magic number is not just their acceptance rate but their matriculation rate.

    So TFA is no doubt acting on the same principle. Being admitted and then doing something else is like turning down a marriage proposal. The suitor gets mighty pissed.

    • So TFA is no doubt acting on the same principle. Being admitted and then doing something else is like turning down a marriage proposal. The suitor gets mighty pissed.

      No doubt. I’ve seen this principle at work in a couple of places. Once, when our daughter applied to private school from 6th grade, they called and asked if we would guarantee enrollment if they let her in. They had already learned where else she’d applied. I couldn’t believe it – for an 11 year old! (We did not guarantee, they wait listed and then accepted her. Risk to the yield rate was eliminated.)

      Also, Harvard has something they call the Z list. If you’re connected and they have to let you in, but you don’t have the chops, you get put on the Z list. This comes with a letter inviting you to matriculate after a gap year. These admits are not counted in the stats for either matriculating class. Talk about whoring. Six middling kids in my son’s high school were put on that list. Only one turned them down and went to NYU instead.

  • I once asked my husband if he were forced to choose between a girl who was a little chubby and had a pretty face vs. a girl who had a great body and an ugly face, which would he choose? He struggled with the answer, but ultimately chose the pretty face and a little overweight.

    It makes more evolutionary sense in my opinion. An average height female who could lose 25lbs does not suffer a major blow to her fertility, and the pretty face indicates higher innate estrogen levels. Most cultures try to fatten girls up with meat, fish and eggs as part of ancient and traditional fertility rituals.

    But there is definitely an upper limit to the weight thing. I think that limit is generally when the face becomes affected by being too fat.

  • Ramble

    What will seem odd is a 25 y/o mom because in these places, such moms basically do not exist.

    If a girl did want to have her first child while she is at her peak of health and fertility, she would likely never be able to afford to live in Brookline.

    Few in Brookline, or Cambridge, or much of anywhere else in the upper-class world could give two shits about this, of course.

    That plus parental pressure to go to college and then excell at some career combines to make this girls think that it’s normal to wait until at least 30 to even think about having kids.

    Actually, I don’t agree so much about the Upper Middle Class beating into their daughters brains about some amazing career. Maybe for the Upper Class, but not so much for the UMC. But, I can only speak for what I saw.

    Good Career? Stable Career? Nice Job? Ability to meet and socialize with “good” people? Yes, absolutely.

    Becoming a Brain Surgeon and not being able to have children before 35…I did not see that.

    “Oh Jenny is home with her two babies.” Not until Jenny is at least 35

    Again, I am not seeing that. At least for the UMC (and maybe not for the UC), those mothers start pestering their daughters about marriage by their late 20’s.

  • Ramble

    I once asked my husband if he were forced to choose between a girl who was a little chubby and had a pretty face vs. a girl who had a great body and an ugly face, which would he choose?

    Whoa, why so unequivocal?

    How about, 25 lbs overweight versus a slightly below average face?

    Hope, I hope that your husband clarified in his answer that, “Well, Honey, the fatter girl can simply lay off the bagels”.

  • Escoffier

    pestering for marriage by late 20s, sure, but that means kids no earlier than early 30s. It just does not happen here (or on the other coast). In part, as you note, because all the places these people want to live are sooooo expensive.

  • Brendan

    irls who grow up in (say) Brookline or the little suburb where I live or in most of UMC blue America–Their own mother will be over 30 and all their friends will have mothers well over 30 and sometimes over 40. They will see this as normal. What will seem odd is a 25 y/o mom because in these places, such moms basically do not exist.

    Right. My son’s mother was 27 when he was born, and that raised a LOT of eyebrows, even though it was just after she had graduated from law school. Almost all the other moms in the mom groups and so on were at least 30 and many 35+. It’s the new normal for the UMCs.

    That plus parental pressure to go to college and then excell at some career combines to make this girls think that it’s normal to wait until at least 30 to even think about having kids. UMC parents want to brag that their daughter went to Yale and then to Wharton or Duke Law, clerked for the 1oth Circuit, is a Deputy Assistant to the President or SVP in Tokyo at age 28. They really don’t want to have to say to their friends, “Oh Jenny is home with her two babies.” Not until Jenny is at least 35, has the resume behind her, and a man making a boatload of cash.

    True, but I also wonder if it isn’t also, in part, the new MRS degree? In other words, the assortative mating in the UMC is now working in two ways, and guys also want to marry women with resumes, even if such women eventually become SAHMs (not uncommon with highly-educated UMC couples I know). So in order to get the MRS degree, a woman needs not only the actual degree and opportunity to meet in college or grad school, but the resume and track record after that as well to make for a truly optimal assortative match. I suspect that is is quite a bit of what is going on as well, despite the sense in the manosphere that men are not interested in this. Perhaps most men are not, but in highly-educated professional UMC, a woman’s resume is important in assortative mating, and not just her degree.

    • @Brendan

      So in order to get the MRS degree, a woman needs not only the actual degree and opportunity to meet in college or grad school, but the resume and track record after that as well to make for a truly optimal assortative match. I suspect that is is quite a bit of what is going on as well, despite the sense in the manosphere that men are not interested in this. Perhaps most men are not, but in highly-educated professional UMC, a woman’s resume is important in assortative mating, and not just her degree.

      Agreed, the UMC is the last holdout for assortative mating. Most of the parents I’ve known through the years of raising kids have had the same level of education. And that holds true for grad school as well. Lots of couples are both lawyers, both physicians, both shrinks, etc. And of course it’s true in my case as well. No doubt most of us met our spouses in school. At 27, I had no qualms about committing, the timing seemed perfect. I wouldn’t have settled down any earlier than that, I don’t think.

  • Ramble, I did mean below average face, not hideously deformed or anything. Anyway, he still had to think about it, and made it clear he did not like the question. In his answer he said he’d rather have good body and good face. But he is also a guy who prefers girls on the more petite side. There are men who like women with bigger builds and more meat on their bones.

    And yeah, he did take into consideration that the chubby girl can lose weight.

  • Escoffier

    Brendan, absolutely.

    But it’s not just the assortive mating social cue for the male that’s important. It’s also important for the woman’s psyche. She gets to say (to herself and her peers) “I’m not just a mom, I’m accomplished, I have exceeded my mother and grandmother’s generations and also I have not squandered what the womens movement made possible for me. I am not defined by a man. I am SOMEBODY!!!” This latter point is, I believe, more important than the former. That is, it’s more important to her, to what motivates her.

  • Ramble

    She was threatened on several occasions and had to call the police once.

    At the end of her first year, she gave 11 Fs. The principal called her in and told her that would not do. She had to pass those kids. She refused. He pressured her further, and she said, “I work for TFA and you cannot make me change those grades.” He changed them and the kids were pushed along.

    She is the sweetest, smartest kid, but that job aged her and made her cynical.

    This completely jibes with what my friend went through.

    Some day we will need to trade stories on that most hallowed of institutions, The Peace Corps.

  • Brendan

    But it’s not just the assortive mating social cue for the male that’s important. It’s also important for the woman’s psyche. She gets to say (to herself and her peers) “I’m not just a mom, I’m accomplished, I have exceeded my mother and grandmother’s generations and also I have not squandered what the womens movement made possible for me. I am not defined by a man. I am SOMEBODY!!!” This latter point is, I believe, more important than the former. That is, it’s more important to her, to what motivates her.

    I think it’s a mixture of both, but I’d agree that this is also an important factor, especially for the ones who become SAHMs later (“well I clerked for Justice Souter and then worked at Cravath for six years before I decided I wanted to spend more time with my kids. 🙂 I’m just grateful I had the choice *cue smile at law partner husband*”). It’s a mix of both, I think, really, but certainly the voiced motivation is as you suggest (and it’s part of the internal one as well, given the way women socialize with each other and how important that is).

  • Ramble

    But he is also a guy who prefers girls on the more petite side. There are men who like women with bigger builds and more meat on their bones.

    Well, petite or more meat, very few guys like girls who look sickly…though Susan gave at least one example of a guy who desired that.

  • Ramble

    …pestering for marriage by late 20s, sure, but that means kids no earlier than early 30s. It just does not happen here (or on the other coast).

    Well, the pestering begins because the mothers want to make sure that it get’s done…and soon.

    I think that most of those mothers would be happiest with their daughter starting the baby making by her late 20’s.

    And, for the East Coast, I grew up in a UMC neighborhood in the wealthiest state in America within the largest metropolitan area in North America.

  • Escoffier

    Also, don’t forget that she is competing with other women. At a certain age (by “certain” read “later”) she gets points for being able to stay home. She “wins” because her husband can afford to give up her income (he’s not a loser) and she can truly raise her children herself (rather than farm it out, out of necessity).

    But at a younger age, she “wins” by getting the elite degree, the elite job (“elite” for a girl job is not necessarily about money), the swank apartment in the short list of approved cities, the wardrobe, the lifestyle, etc. If she skips this step or abandons it too early for step two, she “loses.”

  • Wow Susan, that’s such a different experience from my husband’s teaching experience in Africa. But he was in the Peace Corps in Ghana, which is one of the African nations that does try to put emphasis on education. He taught high school kids who worked hard, cleaned the classroom, carried water buckets for him, called him “sir,” and were generally polite.

    I never did TFA even though I went to some recruitment sessions. I wanted to get a job ASAP, which turned out to be a good move because I got two years of work experience in before the economy tanked big time. I wasn’t quite as idealistic of a do-gooder because I came from a financially poor background raised by a crazy single-mother. I went to school with inner city kids and then later private school kids, so I saw the spectrum.

    • @Hope

      My guess is that TFA and the Peace Corps are very, very different experiences. I don’t know a kid who did the Peace Corps, though my father did a stint at the age of 64.

  • Brendan

    Also, don’t forget that she is competing with other women. At a certain age (by “certain” read “later”) she gets points for being able to stay home. She “wins” because her husband can afford to give up her income (he’s not a loser) and she can truly raise her children herself (rather than farm it out, out of necessity).

    But at a younger age, she “wins” by getting the elite degree, the elite job (“elite” for a girl job is not necessarily about money), the swank apartment in the short list of approved cities, the wardrobe, the lifestyle, etc. If she skips this step or abandons it too early for step two, she “loses.”

    I agree. The status signaling differs at different ages. It’s quite an elaborately choreographed dance at this point, really.

  • Brendan

    Agreed, the UMC is the last holdout for assortative mating. Most of the parents I’ve known through the years of raising kids have had the same level of education. And that holds true for grad school as well. Lots of couples are both lawyers, both physicians, both shrinks, etc. And of course it’s true in my case as well.

    Definitely this is the norm in the UMC. There are very, very few cases of “marrying out” of the professional social class in the UMC really, for men and women alike. There are cases of women lawyers marrying photographers or artists or what have you as well, but these are not that common, and the artiste is generally also highly educated, if not high earning — some places have more of a cache for this kind 0f thing (Manhattan) than others (DC).

  • Ramble

    Hope, for what it is worth, the people I know that did the Peace Corp, did not come away scarred by it…they just did not respect it all that much either.

  • The midwest and mountain west are different from the coasts in this regard. Girls can get married to guys with advanced degrees even if they don’t have more than a bachelor’s, sometimes associate’s or less. It more depends on how the girl behaves, her looks, family background and general level of classiness. The competition on degrees and professions is a lot less intense.

    Lower living expenses probably factor into this. I know many people who start families in their 20s, bought a comfortable house with at least 3 bedrooms, and a vehicle that can support multiple carseats. None of them are doctors, lawyers or super wealthy.

  • Ted D

    Susan – “She was 26 or so, and we all thought she was just ridiculously young to be there. By the way, she and her husband were high school sweethearts and did not go to college. She was the only young one out of about 40 moms in two classes.”

    Holy crap! You and I live on different planets! My ex-wife was 20 when she had her first child (my step-daughter), and she was 25 when she had my son. My current SO was 21 when she had her first child, and about 23 with her second. My mother was 20 when I was born, and her mother (my grandmother) was 21 when my mother was born. I’ve already said that I know of many single mothers in my area, and I’d wager that 75% of them are in their mid to late 20’s, and I bet there are plenty younger that I don’t see because their kids are not school age yet.

    I guess this explains why we really don’t see things the same way often. Where I’m at, the only 30-something “new” mothers are probably on their second marriage just getting around to having kids, or having a second bunch for the “new” husband. The rest of us all started in our early to mid 20’s at the latest.

    • @Ted D

      Interestingly, I think there was less variance a generation or two ago. My own mother was 22 when she had me, and that was typical mom age when I was growing up. It was made pretty clear to me as I was raised that I had the opportunity to go a lot further and shouldn’t waste it. My parents were the first in their families to go to college, but they were determined to see the next generation advance beyond that.

  • Ted D

    And as far as it goes, my mate and I ARE the “old” parents when we go to school events…

  • Brendan

    The midwest and mountain west are different from the coasts in this regard. Girls can get married to guys with advanced degrees even if they don’t have more than a bachelor’s, sometimes associate’s or less. It more depends on how the girl behaves, her looks, family background and general level of classiness. The competition on degrees and professions is a lot less intense.

    Lower living expenses probably factor into this. I know many people who start families in their 20s, bought a comfortable house with at least 3 bedrooms, and a vehicle that can support multiple carseats. None of them are doctors, lawyers or super wealthy.

    It’s also self-selecting, because the folks from the midwest and mountain west and so on who are “gunning” for higher assortative mating opportunities in, as Escoffier says, “approved cities” (read: coastal cities), tend to migrate away from the midwest and mountain west in favor of the coasts. I met quite a few such people both in California and here on the East Coast as well — people who migrated here after their education (or perhaps as a part of getting it).

  • @SW

    I wonder how things will shift once we’ve passed on.

    Hopefully, much lower payroll taxes for the rest of us : )

    Too bad about Keegan. I have a friend at Yale’s business school who gave me her backstory. Really bright girl.

    It’s good to see my generation (late millennial, early Gen X) has a more realistic view financial well-being. “Prestigous career” and “being wealthy” seem to be priorities for upper-class young people, but no one I know personally.

  • GudEnuf

    Any job can be a job that “makes a difference”. Just take a portion of income you make from that job, and donate it to an efficient charity.

    http://www.utilitarian-essays.com/make-money.html

    You can save a life for less than $1000.

    • @GudEnuf

      One of my favorite ways to give is micro lending. You can support a family by giving a woman a sewing machine.

  • Tom.s

    I’ve noticed on OkCupid, almost all the female 22/23 year olds on there are college educated and have big ambitions and passions for their career.

    Dating someone with a similar education and passion would be nice, but it scares me to think that ‘the numbers’ skew to mostly wannabe “supermoms”.

    I really don’t want that kind of life. I like to stay busy, but I don’t like daily stress. Having a supermom wife would definitely cause that.

    Plus, the logistical challenges of staying with someone with another demanding career intimidates me. I feel like a couple can only have one “real” career and the other has to be flexible with it.

    This is messed up though, because lots of great/desirable women have big ambitions and dreams in their careers.

  • Abbot

    “I feel like a couple can only have one “real” career and the other has to be flexible with it.”

    Why wouldn’t you feel that way? as a human male

  • A Definite Beta Guy

    “Why wouldn’t you feel that way? as a human male”

    Ain’t nothing to do with male, just to do with reality. Career implies moving at one point. My grandfather moved all over the place before he settled down in the Chicago area, and he was offered a much higher position in Tennesse, but eventually he just said fuck it.

    Would have been hard for Grandma to have a career when Grandpa was moving around like that all the time.

    Speaking as a Millennial who had a long stint of unemployment post-grad: Fuck the ideals, give me money.

    Of course, I fight health insurance companies, so I get both.

  • Sassy6519

    I am one of those Millennial women who is pursuing her dream career, but I also never want to have children.

    Since I don’t want kids, there is really no reason for me to not pursue my career.

    I really don’t want that kind of life. I like to stay busy, but I don’t like daily stress. Having a supermom wife would definitely cause that.

    Plus, the logistical challenges of staying with someone with another demanding career intimidates me. I feel like a couple can only have one “real” career and the other has to be flexible with it.

    It’s definitely about compromise.

    The key, for you and your desires, is to find a woman who is comfortable and happy with sacrificing her career. There are indeed women like that out there. You just have to find one.

  • Tom.s

    I’m pretty sure my ex would have have given up her career (engineering) for me. I didn’t let her though. It would have been stupid at the time.

  • OffTheCuff

    Ted:”Holy crap! You and I live on different planets!”

    Sue’s crowd isn’t UMC by any stretch of the imagination. Elites. You haven’t noticed?

  • Kirk

    I received an email from TFA last year urging me to attend one of their recruitment sessions. However, I had to decline due to the fact that I wasn’t going to graduate until the preceding fall.
    Has anyone here worked with TFA? If so, what was it like?
    Do they discretely discriminate against individuals with autism disorders like most organizations?

  • Kirk

    *Following fall, not preceding.

  • Abbot

    Does planning to do well include not permitting this pathetic situation to continue? –

    “In sum, thanks to feminism, very many women slept with too many men for their own happiness; postponed marriage too long to find the right man to marry; are having hired hands do much of the raising of their children; and find they are dating boy-men because manly men are so rare.”

    http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/281795/four-legacies-feminism-dennis-prager

    .

  • Ted D

    OTC – “Sue’s crowd isn’t UMC by any stretch of the imagination. Elites. You haven’t noticed?”

    Well yes. But I guess I never really gave it much thought.

    So really, how many people are we talking about up there? I mean, it seems to me there are WAY more working class/lower class young women out here struggling WAY harder than any girl enrolled in Yale or Harvard. I’m not knocking on anyone, but good grief I actually thought the target audience for HUS was a bit more, diverse than this. I’m finding it a bit hard to be sympathetic for these girls this morning. I mean, if they have families that can afford THOSE kinds of schools, what exactly is it they have to complain about? Guys are assholes?! I’m going to bet that a ton of them are probably just as entitled as the young women, and many are probably spoiled brats of a sort. I’m watching 18 year old women getting pregnant around me, and for these ladies the big decisions is NOT career or children. Their a bit past that, and are now on to worrying about how they are going to raise a child with no real income, no education, and no one to help. (because of course they are getting pregnant to wanna be gangster thugs.) And no one is equipping these girls with the knowledge to better themselves. To keep from becoming a “baby mama”. To understand why they are attracted to thugs and “bad boys”, and it seems even about how to actually use birth control.

    And I’m not nearly in the worst parts of the city. Not by a long shot.

    So HUS is mostly here to help privileged young women find a husband? I’m not saying that isn’t a good thing, but the knowledge here could really be used by people that do not have an ivy league education… It clearly demonstrates to me that the educated and wealthy populations of the U.S. have very little clue about what is going on in the socioeconomic classes below them. If they ever want a real education, they will have to get out of that UMC bubble they live in.

    • @Ted D

      So HUS is mostly here to help privileged young women find a husband? I’m not saying that isn’t a good thing, but the knowledge here could really be used by people that do not have an ivy league education… It clearly demonstrates to me that the educated and wealthy populations of the U.S. have very little clue about what is going on in the socioeconomic classes below them.

      Of course not! Please don’t confuse my own background with my Mission Statement. I’ve always been very open about my own bio. My parents grew up poor in NYC, were the first to go to college. My mother dropped out to get married after her junior year. I grew up solidly middle class. I went to a no-name college but did get my MBA from a good school, and married a fellow graduate.

      Despite OTC’s characterization I consider myself UMC. I am not wealthy, and am extremely relieved to be done paying for college. I do have a lovely home and I feel very fortunate.

      Finally, in Boston elitism can be intellectual or genealogical in addition to financial. I would describe my crowd as being intellectual, but neither WASPy nor rich. It’s not surprising with all the colleges here, and one of the best medical centers in the world.

  • Tom.s

    Ted, I would say the strategies would apply to any class.

    Also, dating strategies that Susan is offering are not offered in any courses during high school or college. They are either a product of your experience/intelligence, or what your friends/family have fostered in you.

    So regardless of class, we are born without the knowledge, and cannot attain it through purchase (like a college class).

  • Jason773

    Susan,

    She was one of the ones who committed treason. :-/

    I have also heard very mixed stories about the experience. My son’s gf did it in Philadelphia, and it was a very challenging two years. She taught remedial algebra, and the age in her classes spanned five years. There were 4 or 5 pregnant girls in her class both years. She was threatened on several occasions and had to call the police once.

    At the end of her first year, she gave 11 Fs. The principal called her in and told her that would not do. She had to pass those kids. She refused. He pressured her further, and she said, “I work for TFA and you cannot make me change those grades.” He changed them and the kids were pushed along.

    She is the sweetest, smartest kid, but that job aged her and made her cynical.

    I wonder how many applicants TFA takes who come from at least somewhat similar inner city lower to lower middle class backgrounds. I’ve heard similar horror stories, but the teacher is always the same; white, UMC to upper class, grew up in the suburbs and has an idealistic view of the world.

    Growing up lower middle class at best, in a big city, I can tell you that kids in inner city schools can smell that kind of upper crust background on you. Not to say that I would be able to do much better, as I have no idea, but I am certain I would be able to relate to the kids better which would most likely help a lot.

    • @Jason

      Growing up lower middle class at best, in a big city, I can tell you that kids in inner city schools can smell that kind of upper crust background on you. Not to say that I would be able to do much better, as I have no idea, but I am certain I would be able to relate to the kids better which would most likely help a lot.

      I’m sure you’re correct. TFA’s perfect applicant is probably someone exactly like you. I will say, though, that my son’s gf did get very close to quite a few of her students, and has gone back to Philadelphia twice this year to visit them. Interestingly, she felt she had the most positive and lasting impact on the pregnant girls, who were receptive to her argument that they owed it to their babies to stay in school. (Most of them planned to have their own moms, around 30, provide childcare.)

      Also, I’m sorry to say it but there’s a lot of dead wood among teachers. In her high school, there were 5 or 6 teachers who spent the whole day in the break room, not teaching. I think they actually called it the rubber room. They were there because they had been deemed unfit to continue teaching, but union rules prevent firing them. So they collect full pay and play poker.

      There’s a reason TFA has been incredibly successful. Just having a teacher who’s smart and gives a shit helps.

  • Richard Aubrey

    I stuck around in college for a short time after I graduated in 1966. Temp medical deferment. Did civil rights in MS, and a volunteer program in a challenged neighborhood–it was run by campus sororities, so I figured they could use the help.
    Those were the days when everybody, but everybody, was going to save the world, except for the business school people, of course. For most of the world-savers, that meant cutting class on Friday afternoon and tossing the Frisbie to stick it to The Man. Or protest the war or something. Tom Lehrer had a nice song about The Folk Song Army which applied even to people who weren’t singing.
    I’ve been involved in volunteer stuff ever since, including the Army for which I volunteered.
    What I have learned is that about half of the stuff is for self-congratulations. Try talking to some of the folks about the actual results, and the opportunity costs.
    Some of this stuff is an excuse for ducking responsibility.
    Head Start, just as an example, is a favorite with a number of groups, despite study after study showing no lasting effect whatsoever. But it’s jobs for somebody.
    There’s nothing wrong with commerce, even operating with synthetic derivatives of bundled loser mortgages as long as you don’t break the law.
    Money has to move to do anybody any good and it has to be in the most effective places. Big shot finance folks are sort of like the stock guys in super market, except they get to set their own wages.
    Point is, you can do any of this stuff while raising a family, if you want to. If not…okay. But take your preening elsewhere. The rest of us are on to it.

  • Abbot

    Expect MUCH more of this sort of narrative to appear in the mainstream media:

    “Hello! I work for a major American women’s magazine and we are looking to speak with a woman JUST like you. We’d like to speak with you (anonymously) as part of a story about the number of sexual partners women have, and their positive and negative feelings about their number, to get a conversation going about this taboo subject. It would be completely anonymous. Please email me at [email address blocked] if you are interested. Thank you so much! –Jen”

    Taboo? Apparently not taboo anymore. How does the “planning well” crowd feel about that?

    http://www.dearcupid.org/question/would-you-forgive-a-woman-with-an-extremely.html
    .

  • Escoffier

    I don’t quite know where the line is between “elite” and UMC. I’m not sure it’s so easy to find. Part of the definition of the UMC is that they (we) are the water carriers and high-priced valets of the Davos overclass. So, both “classes” tend to mingle a lot. In fact, they can’t get by without one another. Their tastes, habits, manners, worldviews and looks are essentially the same. Often the only thing distinguishing them is money, which often turns on almost arbitrary decisions. E.g., John graduated from Harvard and joined Goldman and 15 years later is a decamillionaire whereas Jim graduated in the same class and went to work for the NYT, where 15 years later is earning in the (very) low 6 figures. Both those jobs are very prestigious, very hard to get, and there is a lot of competition for them. John will still be happy to associate with Jim, invite him to the Hamptons on weekends, and even have his son marry Jim’s daughter (so long as she looks the part and goes to the right schools). Then the grandkid eventually joins Goldman and he’s a centimillionaire …

    It’s not like Upstairs/Downstairs or a Trollope novel where the successful soliciter who is alpha in his circle may see the earl on business in his Westminster office but never get invited to dinner. In fact, the people who work for the Davos overclass and get paid 1/100th of what their bosses earn, are routinely invited to socialize as equals, or close.

  • Abbot

    “This book is an indispensable manual for the modern man whether he’s single, dating, engaged, or married. The author analyzes the effect female promiscuity is having on American society through a colorful mix of existential and psychological inquisition and humorous first-hand narrative. While ostensibly written for men, the author charts a course that draws readers of both genders into the fight. The reader is brought through a journey of self-awareness and enlightenment in recognizing the unequivocal existence of this social phenomenon. Through a maze of discovery inspired by very explicit and often hilarious incontestable accounts and logical reasoning, the reader is left with deep introspection about staying the course or advocating reform.”

    http://books.google.com/books/about/Your_Wife.html?id=TT6VZwEACAAJ

    .

  • For a person to talk about his goal to “save the world,” or such, isn’t necessarily a sign of genuine idealism. It’s very likely a sign of conformism, of going along with the attitudes that are expected in a particular circle.

    There’s a lot of mythology in the whole “public service” / “nonprofit” thing. A politician who devotes his life to the pursuit of power and adulation isn’t automatically a more moral individual than a businessperson who works to make a profit. Someone who writes papers about agricultural policy while working for a “nonprofit” isn’t morally superior to a farmer who actually grows food or to a trucker who transports it.

  • Abbot,

    It was funny how that dearcupid link was full of ‘you go girl’ support from other females, using shaming language on the bf and calling him insecure. It wasn’t even as if her number was 10 or 20, it was 70! Unreal.

  • Abbot

    “It was funny how that dearcupid link was full of ‘you go girl’ support from other females, using shaming language on the bf and calling him insecure.”

    These flapping lip cheerleaders, promiscuous themselves obviously, conveniently never mention all those other men who benefit from the sexual service. They call the bf insecure as if he is somehow obligated to accommodate these excuses for women and yet make no mention of how “insecure” the other 22, 56 or 70 would be if it was going to be anything more than sex.

    Its an anonymous cock. Its an “insecure” man. Its the same man.

  • Ted D

    Susan – “Please don’t confuse my own background with my Mission Statement. ”

    I’m not, but I’ve had this discussion a little bit with Escoffier before, and now more than ever I’m really seeing the disconnect here. I get that UMC women may be seeing a shortage of “good men”, but honestly that isn’t even close to the worst problems out there. I’m starting to feel a bit like I’m on the lower levels of a sinking ship, and the people on deck are still partying and having a good time. And the discussion about “starting a family after 30” just really drove that home to me. My So went to college AFTER she had two children so she could earn more to try and keep up living in New Hampshire. My ex-wife never finished college, and I didn’t manage to get my degree until just a few years back because my employer paid for it. I know several people that are currently using Phoenix U. or other online colleges to finally get a degree as well, and these are folks in their 30’s and 40’s. I guess I’m saying that most of the people I know didn’t have much of a choice, or at least most of them didn’t see that they had many choices. And my daughter who is graduating from high school this week has several friends that are pregnant and under 21 years old. These aren’t stupid girls. They have been to my house, had dinner at my table, and told me about what they wanted to do with their lives. One of them was afraid to tell me she was pregnant, but she told her parents by text message…

    I’m frustrated because it all seems like such a waste to me. There are guys running around acting like “bad boys” (admittedly some of them probably ARE real bad boys) because it gets them laid, and all these young, smart girls fall for it over, and over, and over again. They are behaving in ways that make the ‘sphere at large look like it is correct, and it depresses me to no end, because it doesn’t have to be this way. I’ve looked these girls in the eyes, and saw that they wanted something better for themselves. And yet the next time they encountered some dude with “swagger”, they jumped into bed with him and got pregnant. Of course my first question was “did you use birth control?” One answered “we didn’t have any” (it took all I had to contain my outburst of THEN DO NOT HAVE SEX) and the other said the guy told her the condom broke. Of course, she didn’t actually SEE him even put one on, so my guess is he just lied to go bare back. That one was planning on going to nursing school, was a straight A student, and did great on her SATs. What. The. Hell…

    *deep breath*

    So yeah, I’ve been in a pretty shitty state of mind the past few weeks. I’m just disgusted by much of what I see going on around me, and I feel mostly powerless to do a damn thing about it. Yet I know many of the reasons why this is all happening, and it really is maddening some days. The problem is, the “fix” is not in any way politically correct, so instead everyone will just keep on drinking while the ship sinks. Eventually the deck will start to flood, and I have to wonder what the passengers up there will think when they realize they had plenty of time to do something about it.

    • @Ted

      The problem is, the “fix” is not in any way politically correct, so instead everyone will just keep on drinking while the ship sinks. Eventually the deck will start to flood, and I have to wonder what the passengers up there will think when they realize they had plenty of time to do something about it.

      I get what you’re saying about socioeconomic status, which is a very real divider in the SMP. But I don’t see why one group should be more responsible for the solution than any other group. It’s about personal responsibility – why kick it up to the deck?

  • Ted D

    “They were there because they had been deemed unfit to continue teaching, but union rules prevent firing them. So they collect full pay and play poker.”

    And there is another reason many cities are in the shitter: crappy public school systems. I grew up surrounded by mill guys. My grandfather, my uncles, and some of my cousins worked in steel mills and of course they were all very pro-union. The problem is, unions are no longer any help for workers, they are just another political organization concerned with its own power and influence. I’ve gotten into “heated debates” with a few friends that have teachers in their family because I firmly believe the teachers union is AT LEAST 50% responsible for the crappy state of our public schools. Things like the example above prove to me that the union doesn’t care one bit about our children’s education, and at least some of the member teachers don’t either. If I was honest, I’d say the union is 75 to 85% responsible, and the rest should be shared by school administration and the federal government. I would put more blame on administration, but they are completely hampered by the teachers union from being able to actually manage their schools how they see fit, so to me it would be like blaming a fireman for not saving a burning house that someone doused with gas and lit with a match. At that point, the best they can do is keep the fire from spreading, and in many cases school administration can only do their best to keep collateral damage to a minimum. To be clear, collateral damage in that context is OUR CHILDREN not getting a proper education. I’ve gone to school board meetings in my district with a few other involved parents, and I’ve learned that it isn’t a lack of desire from the administration that often hampers improvement efforts, it is the union rules and regulations that have their hands tied.

    • @Ted D

      As someone who was very active in my kids’ schools, I will say that I am extremely anti Teachers Union. I support extensive standardized testing for that reason – we need to quantify what kids are learning to expose these abuses.

  • Escoffier

    “I’m on the lower levels of a sinking ship, and the people on deck are still partying and having a good time”

    That’s about right and it explains California very well.

    You might console yourself with the thought that we are going to drown too, just a little later you do. However, I am not sure that is true.

    To me this is THE biggest question about “the future” and the direction of society and I don’t know the answer. Can the UMC Bubble/Davos Archipeligo survive forever, no matter what happens everywhere else? Now, the Davos class does not recognize that there is a problem. To them, everything is fine, more of the same, please and thank you. I think that is obviously wrong however it is the ruling idea in the high-functioning part of the world today. Greece and the Spanish banks and the Euro aside, the Davos class thinks this is a technical problem that it can fix if only the damned voting/marching masses butt out of things they don’t understand. So, they deny there is even a problem below decks.

    We, however, know that is not true. Those in the UMC who are dimly aware of the problem, it seems to me, force themselves to believe that no matter what happens below decks, quality of life above decks can be maintained indefinitely. To change metaphors, they believe the UMC bubble is self-contained and impregnable.

    There are arguments to be made on both sides. I don’t know which are stronger.

  • Ted D

    Escoffier – “To change metaphors, they believe the UMC bubble is self-contained and impregnable.”

    That may be true, but it sure does suck for the majority of us on the lower levels. And frankly, it is a bit off-putting to think that most of those living in the UMC bubble really do feel like the rest of us are expendable. But, I can say with 100% assurance that there are FAR more people below deck than on deck, and those people having fun up there better hope the doors keeping people out of their party hold tight. At the risk of sounding like a conspiracy nut (in the interests of full disclosure, I would like to point out again that I am not completely against a real revolution in this country at this point) I can’t help but wonder why the upper class isn’t concerned at all. Didn’t they all take history? Does no one remember the French revolution?

    I’ll say this. If it gets bad, REALLY bad in the U.S. of A. anyone with money better get out of town and hide. Because all of the poor slobs that have been stuck on the lower levels are going to rip the shit out of the upper deck the second they get access.

    To be honest, I feel a bit like a poser even talking about this, because I KNOW beyond all doubt that what *I* see everyday isn’t the worst. Obsidian has talked about the black community, and I know that the predominantly black areas around here are very rough places to live. The thing is, it is spreading to neighborhoods like mine and even beginning to encroach on more upscale areas. Sure, they can police their own just fine, but the masses accumulating at their doors are starting to climb the walls. And they don’t care about the rules at all.

    Sorry Susan. I’m going WAY off the subject, but I find that this all ties together to form one massively depressing picture. What UMC folks see as a lack of “good men” down here looks like a complete disaster of epic proportions. It is getting harder and harder for me to sympathize with someone that is simply finding it hard to get a date, when there are likely hundreds of single mothers in a few mile radius around my home. And the sad part is, if they were divorced I would actually feel better about it. But no, many of them are simply young women that got pregnant to another useless lump of flesh shaped like a man. If you really want to see a lack of “good men”, come visit sometime. I can probably pull together a group of young women from my area that can tell you a thing or two that will scare the hell out of you. It scares me…

  • Abbot

    “they’re still not interested in marriage, co-habitation, or in anything serious with women.”

    Ah, but look at the current slut venting series-

    Sluts walk – just google that
    Sluts vote – http://www.thisslutvotes.com/index.html
    Sluts marry! – expect that very soon

    “misleading them is kinda naughty”

    actually, it is the self serving, agenda driven and behaviorally insecure feminists who are misleading women

  • Escoffier

    Ted, it’s not that they think the lower orders are expendable. It’s that they think they (the UMC and above) have all the answers and if only their entire program could be implemented, it will all work out for everyone.

    However there is also a strain, not the dominant strain but a strong and growing strain, which holds that national borders are irrelvant. It doesn’t matter if “sound policy” hollows out or destroys the American working and middle classes so long as people somewhere else benefit. If one American LMC worker loses his job but ten peasants in China rise to the MC, that is a good trade. A lot of people in the Davos class believe this.

  • I’m not a feminist, but I really don’t care to read about the kind of junk that men like Richard and Abbott put here. How is it even productive discussion?

    • @Hope

      I’m not a feminist, but I really don’t care to read about the kind of junk that men like Richard and Abbott put here. How is it even productive discussion?

      It’s not, it’s just noise. I don’t know why Abbott thinks his comments are effective communication – I don’t have too many sluts among my readers. Richard is just another asshole, littering the thread with crap. We won’t be seeing him again.

  • Awesome. So now hair loss is caused by having a family.

    I love it when people are smart.

  • Escoffier, I’m not sure how I feel about that, even though I was born in China and later became an American citizen. The kind of jobs being exported are not great jobs, and the profits mostly float to the top. But that’s more on the economics side, and I’m not going to delve too much into it.

    Socially speaking, Asia is also undergoing upheaval. The masses of poor in Asia are a lot more socially conservative than the upper class. The rural and impoverished are not promiscuous and work hard to try to make a better life. The new middle class and richer are the ones engaging in the same stuff they see in Western media.

    The dam holding some of this back is the fact that the elite in China are very controlling and try to censor the media, so as to ensure that the sexual debauchery doesn’t get out of control. There was a dating TV show that was very popular which got cancelled and replaced with cultural programming. In addition to censoring politics on the Internet, they firewall porn. It makes some sense given the traditions of “face” and “propriety.”

    But basically, low socioeconomic status does not always lead to promiscuity and high out-of-wedlock birth rates. There’s a large cultural component to sexual conservatism and its relationship with SES.

  • Sassy6519

    @ Hope

    I’m not a feminist, but I really don’t care to read about the kind of junk that men like Richard and Abbott put here. How is it even productive discussion?

    Seriously, why can’t they take their drivel where it’s actually appreciated and encouraged? Why do they insist on saying the same shit over and over again here? Why?

    “Sluts” are bad. We get it.

    Move the fuck on.

  • Ted D

    Susan – you misunderstand my point. I’m not laying the blame at the upper deck, but let’s face it, the folks up there have much more ability and resources to do something now before it reaches them, yet most seem to be completely oblivious to what’s going on. Surely it isn’t anyone individual person’s fault, but as the saying goes “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” (I might have butchered the actual quote…). UMC folks have the ability to actually influence and change/make policy. As you pointed out, they are lawyers, and doctors, and politicians. The average guy on the street has little to no chance to make any significant difference short of outright violence against other people, but folks with money and power have the ability to make sweeping changes with minimal effort.

    In terms of HUS, I see the knowledge shared here and in the ‘sphere that could really help some of these young women. (yes Richard, I know they are no angels. It doesn’t change the fact that they are in an environment that sets them up to fail at every turn…) most men in the ‘sphere are either indifferent to this plight or actively counsel other men to take advantage of women with “daddy issues” as if they are of no worth at all short of a place to drop a load. These guys are sending young men out to take advantage of the young girls I shared meals with, and it makes my blood boil. I’ve said before that I understand why a guy might go full PUA once discovering game because the attitude in the ‘sphere is one of selfishness and narcissism. But even here the subject of how things are in what I consider to be the “real world” are often glossed over or minimized because it doesn’t fit the mold. I’m trying to do something to help, but it’s an awful lot like pissing in the wind. The same girl that months ago asked my advice for after graduation is now signing up for public housing and assistance because her “baby daddy” sells his food stamps for .50 on the dollar so he can buy beer and fast food. Is it her fault? Absolutely, and she admits it. But the thing is, nobody ever told her to avoid these kinds of men. Nobody explained to her why she should avoid them, or why she would even find them attractive. She’s never seen what dominance looks like if it isn’t wrapped in sagging jeans and a hoodie, and she said she expects to “do it all herself” because “she can never depend on a man to live up to his responsibilities” or in other words, she doesn’t believe she will ever have access to men that aren’t douchebags.

    • @Ted D

      UMC folks have the ability to actually influence and change/make policy. As you pointed out, they are lawyers, and doctors, and politicians. The average guy on the street has little to no chance to make any significant difference short of outright violence against other people, but folks with money and power have the ability to make sweeping changes with minimal effort.

      As a practical matter, what policy changes would you suggest? Most of what we discuss here is not controlled by government or politicians. How can policy change the SMP? To the extent that I do have any influence, I attempt to use it for the greater good, but I am not alone. I know many highly educated people working for causes that are important to them, including teen motherhood.

      It seems to me that what you’re describing with that young woman is a massive breakdown of family. Why didn’t her own parents tell her what men to avoid? If she believes all men are douchebags, why get involved with one? I see weakness and irresponsibility here.

  • Travis

    Wow. Ted, that is the first thing I’ve really heard you say that I completely disagree with. You’ve forced me to agree with Richard, and for that, I resent you. I’m not one of those guys whose all about blaming the women, but come on! Seriously?

    “But the thing is, nobody ever told her to avoid these kinds of men. Nobody explained to her why she should avoid them, or why she would even find them attractive. She’s never seen what dominance looks like if it isn’t wrapped in sagging jeans and a hoodie, and she said she expects to “do it all herself” because “she can never depend on a man to live up to his responsibilities” or in other words, she doesn’t believe she will ever have access to men that aren’t douchebags.”

    Sorry, dude. But that sounds an awful lot like the woman who spilled coffee all over herself and then sued McDonalds because “nobody told her the coffee was going to be hot”. There are some things you just have to take responsibility for figuring out yourself. Nobody told me that women who cheat on their husbands or smoke meth are a bad choice for a mate, either. But somehow I figured it out on my own and managed to avoid sleeping with those women.
    I’m down on the douchebags too. But those girls are responsible for their choices, just like everyone else. And yes, I know you preceded your statement with “Is it her fault? Absolutely, and she admits it.”, but then you turned right around and completely excused her of all responsibility in the next sentence.
    The fact of the matter is, if she can’t figure out that those dudes are probably not the best boyfriend/ husband/ baby daddy material without someone to explain it to her, then she probably shouldn’t leave the house, because she’s too stupid to function in society without hurting herself.

  • Alias

    Hope:
    “I’m not a feminist, but I really don’t care to read about the kind of junk that men like Richard and Abbott put here. How is it even productive discussion?”
    ——–

    While painful to read, I think they’re providing a public service to the decent folks who are trying to navigate the SMP, by letting us look into their thought process. Personally, I save these comments as invaluable teaching material on who and what to avoid, but that’s just me.

  • Donkey

    @Susan
    “what policy changes would you suggest?… How can policy change the SMP? ”

    The problems are not simply in government policy, the problem is in a lack of objective morality. Public policy in democracies mainly reflect common ideas about justice, right and wrong. As such as the people’s ideas about the nature of right and wrong change governmental policy reflects that.

    Under the comstock laws contraception was banned in the United States. In 1930 the Lambeth conference of the Anglican communion voted to allow contracetption in extreme moral circumstances, and only if abstinence was impossible. In 1965 the Supreme Court discovered a penumbra of privacy (a penumbra comes from latin which means almost a shadow) and declared that there is no way contraception can be interfered with. In 1973 the same court cited their earlier discovery of these constitutional shadows to declare abortion the new state sacrament.

    Today the Federal government is threatening to shutter Catholic universities, who accept no public funds, if they don’t pay for abortions. Eric Holder is forcing Mississippi universities to open wide the doors of the female bathroom stalls to any d. in drag. Scotland is wasting billions revising all their medical documentation to remove all references about “fathers” in their state funded medical system, because it makes lesbians who know not their inseminators feel bad. Doctors and hospitals are being sued into bankruptcy because they wouldn’t perform a penile mutilation (sex change) surgery when hospitals nearby were eager. In New Mexico wedding photographers are being threatened with imprisonment if they do not pay thousands of dollars to homosexuals who want to use them as their photographers and the photographers refuse due to moral objections.

    Public policy? Ha. That is not where the battle lies. Public ethos is.

    The number one show for incredibly impressionable teenage girls is little short of forty minutes of hedonistic advocacy.

    Any civilization not founded in an objective external morality is destined for tyranny.

    Ethos > Ideas > Public Policy

    • @Donkey

      I agree with that. The most useful thing we can do is get ideas into the public sphere and initiate discussion and debate. If I didn’t think that could make a difference, I wouldn’t be engaged in the exercise of writing a blog. My background and financial security make it possible for me to undertake the exercise. I don’t kid myself though – I’ve had enough uncomfortable moments at dinner parties to know that I am never going to influence public policy around feminism and female privilege. That’s why my goal is to work at the margins. Unfortunately, the nature of the medium means that a whole segment of the population just isn’t going to hear what I have to say.

  • Meh, its not like Richard or Abbot are starting a flame war. Leave them be.

    @ Ted
    ” It is getting harder and harder for me to sympathize with someone that is simply finding it hard to get a date, when there are likely hundreds of single mothers in a few mile radius around my home. And the sad part is, if they were divorced I would actually feel better about it. But no, many of them are simply young women that got pregnant to another useless lump of flesh shaped like a man.”

    Man. You definitely HAVE NOT taken the red pill if you want other men to think that a single mother or divorced mother is a good option. These are women that HAVE DEMONSTRATED their inability to correctly choose a mate not only for sex but for actual child bearing. The divorced ones have shown, ontop of that first part, that they really don’t give a damn about their husbands and feel no sense of commitment.

    Also, while she might be telling the truth at that time, I personally would never trust the affections of a woman with a kid. Knowing what I do now about how much women live in the world of their emotions, how much of that ‘affection’ she feels towards me would be tied up in the resources of time, energy, money, and emotional support that she’d be getting from me to help raise a child that IS NOT MINE? How long before she comes to see those things as something she deserves as a right, just like she obviously deserves the previous poor bastard’s child support/alimony, instead of something I’m freely giving her?

    No. Just no. A single mother is never ‘a quality date’ unless she’s a very, VERY rare exception to the rule. And she should have to work uphill to prove that to a man right from the start.

  • Escoffier

    Hope, you can substitute any other nation for China. The point is, to members of this class, they have no national loyalty or fellow feeling for other citizens at all. They think of themselves as a borderless overclass whose true loyalty and fellow-feeling are owed only to each other.

    Ted/Susan, it’s all well and good to say that we all bear responsibility for society’s direction, and true as far as it goes, but the UMC overwhelmingly controlls the commanding heights, sets the agenda and tone of the discourse, decides what can be discussed on what terms, and runs the actual political institutions.

  • Ramble

    Meh, its not like Richard or Abbot are starting a flame war. Leave them be.

    Leap, they may not be starting a war, but they are shitting in someone elses backyard.

  • “Meh, its not like Richard or Abbot are starting a flame war. Leave them be.”

    Correction. They WEREN’T starting a flame war until you didn’t leave them be.

    Ugh.

    • Richard and Abbot are not cut from the same cloth. Abbot hates promiscuity and feminism but he likes women. He married one. Richard II (he’s more like the III) is an unpleasant, bitter, and angry male who loathes women.

      Abbot’s annoying but I wouldn’t kick him out of my house. I’d call the police on Richard.

  • @ Sassy
    “I am one of those Millennial women who is pursuing her dream career, but I also never want to have children.

    Since I don’t want kids, there is really no reason for me to not pursue my career.”

    Fair enough. Honestly I’m doing much the same – though setting myself up to get a university position teaching theatre later in life. More stability for when I stop wanting to do this whole independent artist thing and, if I chose to and find a woman worth having kids with, ability to do that as well.

    Till then, I’ll keep love making a living as an artist. Make many of my own hours, work in coffee shops half the time, with my hands covered in paint or saw dust the rest of the time.

    Chasing a dream is good. Just make sure you run fast enough to catch it while still enjoying the journey on the way.

  • @ Hope
    “The midwest and mountain west are different from the coasts in this regard. Girls can get married to guys with advanced degrees even if they don’t have more than a bachelor’s, sometimes associate’s or less. It more depends on how the girl behaves, her looks, family background and general level of classiness. The competition on degrees and professions is a lot less intense.”

    Which is why I love Chicago and am glad I grew up in Golden, Colorado. There are more women here who are feminine and honest human beings instead of commercialized career grrrrrrrls.

    That being said, more is not majority. At least to this mid-20’s artist, I still have to wade through a ton of women to find those needles in haystacks. There’s just more needles out here and less fish that view me as a bicycle.

  • Ramble

    Susan forgot to mention that the only people allowed to shit on her backyard are men who’ve never had a girlfriend and are up to marry anything with a vagina, and the women who continue to perpetuate the myth of the fabled woman, the one who is so different from the majority of women, that the men won’t be raped by the divorce courts when she grows weary of him and wants to jump ship, LOL!

    Look, if you want to discuss things like Divorce Rape, go nuts…but try to pretend like you are in her living room and not lobbing shit-bombs from over the fence.

  • Alias

    Richard,
    If your comments are directed at mine, then state so directly.

    About young men not interested in marrying:
    If they’re not interested in marrying, then they shouldn’t.

    My position is that the majority of the population isn’t comprised of “decent” people. So, my wish is that those who are – protect themselves from being shafted by those who aren’t. Is there something about this that offends you?

  • Abbot

    “About young men not interested in marrying:
    If they’re not interested in marrying, then they shouldn’t.

    My position is that the majority of the population isn’t comprised of “decent” people. So, my wish is that those who are – protect themselves from being shafted by those who aren’t.”

    What is sad is the effort needed these days to be protected or feel protected.

    Is all this really worth it?:

    http://boldanddetermined.com/2012/01/21/pick-the-right-wife/

    .

  • Passer_By

    “@leap
    “Man. You definitely HAVE NOT taken the red pill if you want other men to think that a single mother or divorced mother is a good option. ”

    I think you misread his point. He was not saying he was finding it hard to sympathize with men who can’t get a date (although he may well not sympathize with them for other reasons) or that men should seek out single moms. I think he was saying that he found it hard sympathize with privileged young women complaining about lack of dating options when the LMC and lower class women have it so much worse. Although he didn’t make that point all that well by pointing to LMC and lower class single moms, IMO.

    But, fundamentally, he seemed to be saying to Susan’s female audience here is mostly complaining about rich people’s problems.

    • But, fundamentally, he seemed to be saying to Susan’s female audience here is mostly complaining about rich people’s problems.

      I’ll be the first to admit they’re first world problems, but they’re definitely not rich people’s problems. The culture affects all young people, and I have grown tired of debating who has it worse. Could things be worse for college students? Yeah, they could be pregnant by a crack head. That doesn’t mean they’re lucky and thriving. Everyone is welcome here, but it makes sense that the audience here, and at every blog online in fact, is going to be read by people who get online and google search for answers to problems. If a young woman doesn’t do that, I have no way of helping her.

  • Alias

    Abbot:
    “What is sad is the effort needed these days to be protected or feel protected.

    Is all this really worth it?:”
    ———-

    ‘Splain pleez?

  • That one was planning on going to nursing school, was a straight A student, and did great on her SATs. What. The. Hell…

    Evolution Ted, Evolution we are racing against a system that has been working for million of years with the only purpose of past their genes. They will use all their hind-brain power to override the superior brain. Had you ever heard that concept of being intoxicated by someone’s presence? I’m not sure if there had been studies but I wouldn’t be surprised that being around a person of the opposite sex that is highly sexually attractive and the female of the pair is ovulating creates a similar effect in the brain that alcohol’s does. Just a theory but trust me I had seen a lot of really “smart” girls and boys doing the dumbest things and getting pregnant half the time. One of the sexual education talks we plan to cover for our kids “If you feel that you are going to die if you don’t have sex that very moment with an specific person you are very likely in ovulation stage, please run and get a cold shower: Really horny = baby” Hope kids get it.

    I can’t help but wonder why the upper class isn’t concerned at all. Didn’t they all take history? Does no one remember the French revolution?

    There is a lot of theories about this one had the theory that the crazy SMP is the modern equivalent of “bread and circus” so the people at the top don’t have to compete with the wealth with the people that might be climbing and they would be easy to manipulate too. Somedays I beleive is true.

    While painful to read, I think they’re providing a public service to the decent folks who are trying to navigate the SMP, by letting us look into their thought process. Personally, I save these comments as invaluable teaching material on who and what to avoid, but that’s just me.

    You know I love you Abbot but this is the most articulated that you had been on the forum. Is kind of nice. Most of the time you look like a crazy guy with a megaphone crying “The end is night…” ala Rorschach. Maybe you should write more like this one in a while in between “yells” it would make more people pay attention to what you link IMO.

  • Oops mistake. I though I read Abbot, my bad. Ignore it.

  • Ted D

    Travis – “Sorry, dude. But that sounds an awful lot like the woman who spilled coffee all over herself and then sued McDonalds because “nobody told her the coffee was going to be hot”.”

    There certainly is a bit of that mixed in there, no doubt. And like I said, at least in one case the young women in question readily admits it was her own stupidity that got here where she is. Of course to me and most of us it looks like she should have “known” better. I said that EXACT thing when I first found out. The fact that she “should” have known but somehow didn’t is not only a failure on her part to be smarter, but a failure somewhere to instill in her some type of better value system. Which leads me to Susan’s question…

    “Why didn’t her own parents tell her what men to avoid? If she believes all men are douchebags, why get involved with one?”

    I can’t answer the second question, because I honestly didn’t even bother to ask her. To the first? Her parents are divorced, and she lived with her mother and step-father. Now to the best of my knowledge there was no type of abuse or neglect from a legal point, but the simple truth is they really weren’t good parents. She told them she was pregnant by text because she didn’t even respect them enough to say it to their face. And of course they immediately kicked her out of the house.

    “As a practical matter, what policy changes would you suggest? “

    OK, I’m going to go a bit into political stuff here, because despite this site being about the SMP, the core of the issues here come down to family values kinda stuff. I would like to see more policy that actually SUPPORTS family lifestyle, and much less that supports other models. (that is, supporting unwed single mothers through my tax dollars, and massive overhaul of the family court system.) I disagree that what we discuss here is not controlled by politics and government, because it is the federal government that provides the environment that promotes the dysfunction of the SMP. I really hate discussing this, because every single time I am made out to be some bible thumping southerner that wants to put women back in the kitchen. But the truth is, if we as a society do not place any value on solid families, and our government puts most of its efforts into doing things that work against the formation and maintenance of solid families, what we will see is the end of the family unit. In fact, what I’ve been saying all day is: that ship has sailed. Probably not for everyone of course, and some people (UMC for one) aren’t seeing it much at all, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t happening to large numbers of folks. These attitudes start at the top, from the people with power and influence, and then trickle down to the lower classes. To me there really isn’t much to be done at the bottom end except endure it. They can vote all they want, sign all the petitions they want, and if they can even participate a bit in the process. But all it takes to get something done at the top is for one or two key people to support it. It is the same old same repeated over and over in human history, I know. The people in power don’t care about the people under them until they show up with torches to burn down their castle.

    Donkey – Thank you! Your post said much of what I wanted to and couldn’t put into words.

    LoaB – “Man. You definitely HAVE NOT taken the red pill if you want other men to think that a single mother or divorced mother is a good option.”

    I said no such thing anywhere! I’m advocating that we figure out how to create less single mothers, not how to marry them up to beta men. I’m sorry if I gave you that impression somewhere, but that wasn’t my intent.

    Of course I say that having married a woman with a child once upon a time. I’m no longer with that woman, but I am personally thankful that the child is still a major part of my life. But seriously, I would not suggest to any man that it is a “good” idea, and even under the best of circumstances it is a very tough road to travel. For me personally, I see it as improving one child’s life, even if it cost me some of my own. I’m OK with that, because to me it is an investment in the legacy I leave behind. She isn’t my blood, but she was raised with my values and at least some of my ideals and after I’m gone my hope is that she will continue that legacy. But you know that I view the purpose of life far differently than you, so I don’t expect you to see it from my perspective. It was a sacrifice for sure, but one I made willingly (albeit on false information and pretenses) and she wouldn’t be the person she is today if I wasn’t a part of her life. Of all the things I have accomplished in my life, seeing her from a child into early adulthood (as if 18 is really an adult…) is by far one of my greatest achievements. And one that I am very proud of. Obviously it wasn’t a picture perfect childhood, and in the end she still comes from a “broken” home. But I still gave her a better shot, and I will continue to support her regardless of the fact that she carries none of my DNA.

    Escoffier – “Ted/Susan, it’s all well and good to say that we all bear responsibility for society’s direction, and true as far as it goes, but the UMC overwhelmingly controlls the commanding heights, sets the agenda and tone of the discourse, decides what can be discussed on what terms, and runs the actual political institutions.”

    This exactly.

  • Ted D

    Alias – “My position is that the majority of the population isn’t comprised of “decent” people. So, my wish is that those who are – protect themselves from being shafted by those who aren’t. Is there something about this that offends you?”

    You just summed up my view on “people” in general very well. I’m glad I’m not alone in thinking that most people generally suck.

  • @ Passer by
    Ahhhh…. gotcha. I guess I’ll wait and see if clarifies what he meant.

    As for Susan being upper class… Did that really shock anyone here? She’s always been honest with her background – so anyone reading her personal experience stories needs to keep that in mind. Which is why I don’t really respond to her personal stories of women who go to her for advice in person or are part of her women meeting things she had.

    Its not that I discredit their experience. It’s that, even after having lived in Boston for a year during grad school, their world and experience in the SMV is so unlike mine as a 26 year old male working in theatre that it would be naive, at best, for me to try and relate. Plus I hated all of Boston that had to do with meeting anyone outside of theatre, especially women. So if they’re a part of that, and enjoy it, then I REALLY have nothing to offer.

    • Which is why I don’t really respond to her personal stories of women who go to her for advice in person or are part of her women meeting things she had.

      The girls in my women meeting things are a diverse bunch, definitely not all from privileged backgrounds, but they are all college educated. That hardly makes them elites. Most of my BU crew are teachers now, none of them are rich or likely to become rich.

      The SMP dynamics I write about describe college hookup culture, and the post-grad 20s experience. I don’t really think it makes much difference whether one is at an Ivy, a large state school, a small private college, NYC, Michigan, Berkeley or Austin. The same things are going on everywhere.

      Plus I hated all of Boston that had to do with meeting anyone outside of theatre, especially women. So if they’re a part of that, and enjoy it, then I REALLY have nothing to offer.

      LOL! A girl who lives in Boston, doesn’t work in theater, and enjoys life is bad news! I hope guys in Boston heed this warning! How is Emerson going to handle the hordes of young men descending on its theater craft department?

  • Alias

    Richard

    If you think *I’m* here to defend the destruction of families/society, then I’ll let you know that I’m definitely not. What I don’t see is an easy fix besides on the micro-level, with each individual.

    *I’m* not in favor of anyone taking advantage of good men.
    Thanks for clarifying abbot’s point, what I was really asking is if he was specifically directing this at me, I’m not sure if he was. ?
    What’s wrong with my statement?
    “If they’re not interested in marrying, then they shouldn’t.”
    Out of all people, I didn’t expect abbot to oppose that one.

  • ” Plus I hated all of Boston that had to do with meeting anyone outside of theatre, especially women. So if they’re a part of that, and enjoy it, then I REALLY have nothing to offer.”

    And I should clarify that I say this as a male that moved to Chicago not knowing a single soul in the city, now is successfully networking both professionally and personally, and goes out to bars/pubs with friends and solo on a regular basis. Hell, earlier this week I invited two people I met at a coffee shop back to my stoop to drink with me and we had a blast of a conversation.

  • Is the same issue with Kate Bolick at 39 “finding herself single” which makes no sense if she never actually actively worked to get married, YMMV.
    —-
    Anacaona,

    You’re right; this makes absolutely no sense. Not every woman is foaming at the mouth to be a wife and mother (I am not and that is for sure…nothing against any woman who is). I remember the many harsh words that were tossed at Kate Bolick on this blog regarding her article in ‘Atlantic’ and I was like give a gimme a break. Do men (and some women) really still think that the best thing a woman could achieve in her lifetime is being some man’s wife, really?

    I am pretty much knocking at the spinsterhood’s door at this point. I have never wanted children so marriage was never this monumental goal. Yeah, I could drop all my standards if I were desperate enough and find my husband in probably a month from now but it is not that serious for me. I am not saying that I would not like the idea of being married, but not so that I can avoid spinsterhood and judgment. What marry some poor schlub and be miserable (when I am not now) just to say, “Hey, look at me I got a husband!” (I actually know women like this). At least, if you’re single and miserable there is some hope of finding someone you could be happy with but to be married and miserable…you’re rather stuck.

    By the way, it is not 1950-something.

  • Ted D

    LoaB – “Ahhhh…. gotcha. I guess I’ll wait and see if clarifies what he meant.”

    Yeah, my bad for writing horribly. I’m just really worked up over this crap. It’s one thing to talk about it all online with a bunch of strangers, but another to see it in my own life. You know what really made me sad? One of my first thoughts was “thank God it isn’t my daughter.” I’ve always done my best to treat this girl as family, but in the end my own selfishness was first and foremost in my mind.

  • Alias

    Ted D:
    ” most people generally suck.”
    ———
    ^^^
    That’s even better than what I wrote and straight to the point. ha
    Contrary to how that paints me, I don’t walk around all cynical and paranoid. Most people have the potential to do better, but many times they don’t for various reasons, so I don’t expect it. I’m interested in finding solutions so that fewer people suck.

  • Underdog

    “It is getting harder and harder for me to sympathize with someone that is simply finding it hard to get a date, when there are likely hundreds of single mothers in a few mile radius around my home”

    Ted, I think you are the greatest troll I’ve ever met on the internet. Keep stirring the pot, man. I’m enjoying the discussion.

  • Ramble

    Do men (and some women) really still think that the best thing a woman could achieve in her lifetime is being some man’s wife, really?

    I am now going to speak for all men everywhere and say that what most of us were reacting to in that article was her tone and tenor.

    I present, article A:

    Nor the 40-ish journalist who, on our second date, driving down a long country road, gripped the steering wheel and asked, “Are you The One? Are you The One?” (Can you imagine a woman getting away with this kind of behavior?) Like zealous lepidopterists, they swoop down with their butterfly nets, fingers aimed for the thorax, certain that just because they are ready for marriage and children, I must be, too.

    And, article B:

    Everywhere I turn, I see couples upending existing norms and power structures, whether it’s women choosing to be with much younger men, or men choosing to be with women more financially successful than they are (or both at once). My friend M., a successful filmmaker, fell in love with her dog walker, a man 12 years her junior; they stayed together for three years, and are best friends today.

    “Everywhere I turn…”.

    It was things like that that made some of us react the way we did.

    You don’t have to agree, but I think that you can understand.

  • Escoffier

    My vote for Greatest HUS Troll goes to Liza, or maybe Tom.

    • My vote for Greatest HUS Troll goes to Liza, or maybe Tom.

      Too bad we don’t have Jess to kick around anymore.

      Surely Plain Jane in all her incarnations wins this dubious award hands down?

  • @Liza
    The issue is that Kate did used the word “found herself single” and she admits that she knows exactly when she should had married and her article was about regretting it but trying to do what was best what was left of her life. I don’t think that if she had said “I never wanted children or marriage” men would had been so harsh. She earned the scorn because she was practically saying that a go getter woman is completely incapable of marry just because…she made her bed and should lie on it.

    At least, if you’re single and miserable there is some hope of finding someone you could be happy with but to be married and miserable…you’re rather stuck.

    Who taught you that? Being single and miserable also means that you might die and on one will find your body till the smell alerts the neighbors. People on unhappy marriage that stay in then recover after the bad times report being happy again. There is no such a thing as being stuck with someone. Is called enduring the bad times like the wedding vows say for better or worse. I don’t know if you come from a broken home but my parents had been together for 35 years and I saw them elated on happiness, miserable and bored and now content. Nothing in this life is static even friendships have lows, you might personally consider that being with another person always have to bee good, so is good that you don’t want to marry, but there is no such a thing as “being married is being stuck and be single is being free” Those are states of mind, you an be stuck as a permanent singleton full of cats and be free in a marriage, I particularly never feel freer more productive, happy, daring, brave, sexy and hopeful than when I was single and dating (which I hated), YMMV.

  • Ted D

    Alias – “Contrary to how that paints me, I don’t walk around all cynical and paranoid. Most people have the potential to do better, but many times they don’t for various reasons, so I don’t expect it. I’m interested in finding solutions so that fewer people suck.”

    Exactly! Just about everyone has the potential to be better. I’m mostly interested in figuring out what it takes to motivate people to actually DO better. And as much as I appear to by cynical here, I really am not a cynical person. Which is partly why these recent pregnancies have me so upset. I actually thought these girls would do better. They talked the talk, but in the end they failed to walk the walk. So I ask myself: why then did they fail? They aren’t stupid by any means. They at least gave lip service to knowing better, so they can’t claim they were ignorant. They were making plans for a future, so at least on some level they wanted to do better. So I’m really at a loss. There is a failing here besides their own poor judgment.

  • Ted D

    Underdog – “Ted, I think you are the greatest troll I’ve ever met on the internet. Keep stirring the pot, man. I’m enjoying the discussion.”

    Glad you are entertained. Do I get a metal or a trophy? As I understand it, everyone gets one just for showing up. But I figure I deserve something better. 😉

  • Alias

    “So I ask myself: why then did they fail? ”
    ————-

    The parents share a good portion of the blame because they’re the most influential. Perhaps sex ed should be aimed at parents.

    Here’s one that’s never addressed and one of the most effective, IMO, but least talked about strategies to preventing teen pregnancy.

    “Avoidance of places and situations that might lead to sex.”

    http://www.cdc.gov/TeenPregnancy/AboutTeenPreg.htm

  • I got that Kate Bolick was regretful about her choice but it is not like she cannot still get married. She obviously refuses to settle for less than what she wants. If she decided to settle she would be married, it is not that hard. I have never been sold on marriage being the best situation for facilating happiness (it is the best for having children). No else can make someone else happy. I believe happiness is a state of mind not something that can achieved or received through external means or something giving it to you. Sure, sharing my life with someone who really cared about me would definitely enhance my life but expecting them to make me happy because I am not already is a definite recipe for disaster.

    Anacaona, you were probably all the things you mentioned before you met your husband. He probably enhanced those qualities but he was not solely responsible.

  • Ted D

    Susan – “I’ve had enough uncomfortable moments at dinner parties to know that I am never going to influence public policy around feminism and female privilege.”

    Is it really that bad? I see a ton of political crap surrounding feminism, but is it really also that deeply ingrained in Left-leaning UMC life in general? I know it is very deeply ingrained in academia, but I always secretly hoped that most of the “supporters” were only giving it all lip service to tow the party line, and didn’t actually believe it to be true.

    I hate to say it, but it does lend a bit of credibility to the voices out in the dark screeching that the democratic party is full of communists that are hell bent on destroying America as we have come to know it. I’m not implying that the Republican party is any better mind you, but they wrap themselves in the cloak of “family values” and “faith based morality” to try and deflect the fact that they aren’t helping either. But at least from them I get the impression that they are selling us to the Chinese for simple profit, while the left is selling us out because they actually believe that the “American Way (TM)” is wrong. If it comes down to it, I prefer being screwed over for profit rather than ideology, but I guess the end result is the same.

    • @Ted D

      Escoffier is right – it’s impossible to overstate how PC most elites are in the Blue states. What gets me most is the hypocrisy. You should see all my liberal friends bending over backwards to opine that Elizabeth Warren applying to Harvard and Penn as a Native American (she claims to be 1/32, it is unsubstantiated) is not the same as lying on an application. It was the same with the Clinton Lewinsky scandal.

      I find that many local women my age are happy to disapprove of hookup culture, as they claim their daughters have never hooked up with anyone. When I say that it’s a direct result of feminism and the Sexual Revolution their nostrils flare and their eyes narrow. I’m surprised I get invited anywhere, to be honest.

  • Donkey

    Mrs. Walsh,

    I believe your blog has had far more impact than you think.

    Especially in the real world on young people’s lives and decisions.

    • @Donkey

      Thanks for the kind words, they help me renew my energy.

  • Escoffier

    Ted, it is almost impossible to overstate the level of PC stultification in the Blue city UMC.

  • Escoffier

    I am not familiar with Plane Jane. I have a soft spot for Liza, though, the Official HUS Indavertent Stereotype Confirmer. Maybe NAWALT, but she definitely is!

    Tom is really a one-trick troll.

  • Escoffier

    BTW, Sue, nobody stays in Berkeley after graduation unless they are going to grad school or have become a hippie and just want to waste away. For anyone in your cohort, they will immediately move across the Bay if staying up north or go to LA. Or to some other big metro area back east. Berkeley has no 20s scene whatsoever. SF has a huge one, though.

    Eventually when people hit big but they can’t afford PacHeights they may settle for the Berkeley Hills. The views are very nice. The food markets are, IMO, the best in the US that I know of. Especially produce.

    • @Escoffier

      During my trip to Napa and SF last fall, I was amazed by the food quality. A whole store in the ferry terminal devoted to mushrooms! We had the best picnic ever in Sonoma just be stopping by a local market for the best berries and fresh figs I’ve ever had. And the Jack cheese! And I know you hate olives, but they had these very green, very young olives that were incredible. Next time I’m going to read up on what foodie’s recommend most there.

      Boston is stuck in the Ice Age by comparison.

  • I got that Kate Bolick was regretful about her choice but it is not like she cannot still get married. She obviously refuses to settle for less than what she wants. If she decided to settle she would be married, it is not that hard. I have never been sold on marriage being the best situation for facilating happiness (it is the best for having children). No else can make someone else happy.

    This is like an unemployed person saying I could be employed if I found my dream job, you are still unemployed. You are also assuming that what someone wants is good regardless if is realistic, possible or even if the man she wants will want her back. There is a lot of PC BS on this concept that if I dream with a pink unicorn that rides me to the sky I shouldn’t buy and love a Toyota and that makes me smart and empowered and in control of my life. There is such a thing as delusion.

    I believe happiness is a state of mind not something that can achieved or received through external means or something giving it to you. Sure, sharing my life with someone who really cared about me would definitely enhance my life but expecting them to make me happy because I am not already is a definite recipe for disaster.

    I agree with the part of not expecting someone else to make you happy, but that a lot different than being single is the same as being married. We are social creatures and even if we can survive and do good alone and we thrive on couple hood.

    Anacaona, you were probably all the things you mentioned before you met your husband. He probably enhanced those qualities but he was not solely responsible.

    I might had been but I didn’t feel them, or knew how to embrace them. Now that I know I have someone to catch me I’m not afraid to jump. If you want to keep telling yourself that marriage is independent of your state of being that is your prerogative but I totally disagree. That is modern BS, PC talk. Marrying good is better than being single, divorced or marrying bad.

  • the Official HUS Indavertent Stereotype Confirmer. Maybe NAWALT, but she definitely is!

    ???I though that was Sassy’s position? Everytime she mentions the kind of men she likes most men agree that she is the standard most men should imagine when dating out or get infuriated. But then I’m just a girl maybe I’m reading it wrong 😉

    I’m surprised I get invited anywhere, to be honest.

    Part me wants to believe they actually know but can’t bring themselves to say it and admire your courage, the other part thinks they just don’t know how to politely exclude you or/and they value something you have (husband, kids or relationships) 😀

    • @Anacaona

      I though that was Sassy’s position? Everytime she mentions the kind of men she likes most men agree that she is the standard most men should imagine when dating out or get infuriated.

      Agreed, the guys love to use Sassy to say “I told you so.” They really loved doing that with Olive, as she was extremely critical of her own sex.

      Part me wants to believe they actually know but can’t bring themselves to say it and admire your courage, the other part thinks they just don’t know how to politely exclude you or/and they value something you have (husband, kids or relationships)

      Well, I have very loyal friends, and usually it’s when I meet their other friends that this happens. I never bring any of this up, btw. Usually, someone approaches me and asks about it. Sometimes, I give the briefest description and change the subject, in part because I need a break from HUS!

  • Escoffier

    Sassy seems to understand herself, not something I would say about Liza.

  • “My vote for Greatest HUS Troll goes to Liza, or maybe Tom.”

    This is a blog written for women by a woman and most of the commenters here are men and I am the troll, seriously? I know I am not a part of the echo chamber and I know most of the men here just want to say whatever they want about women and the women here are supposed to grin and bear it. Clearly, the men here don’t want to hear what women actually have to say and don’t want to know how we really think or what we want. You just want to sling your shit and we should just put up and shut up. Okay, I got. LOL!

    Susan,

    I don’t know how you deal with it sometimes it is like having a man you have to constantly reassure that he is satisfying sexually every time you both make love. It has to be exhausting and if it were me I would have pulled all of my hair out by now.

    • @Liza207

      You’re cool with me, kid. I do not view you as a troll, no way.

  • Passer_By

    @susan

    For the record, I was simply interpreting Ted’s comment for Leap’s benefit. I would say that I’m not sure why the advice to the girls he talks about would be meaningfully different than the advice here – it’s just that those girls are unlikely to be searching online for it or to be in your “focus groups”. But fundamentally, it’s the same: The guys you encounter tend to be jerks and cads because women in your demographic are rewarding jerks and cads to the determinent of responsible guys. In Ted’s case, he could add “felons, drop outs and sociopaths” to the list of guys being rewarded.

  • Escoffier

    Susan, the mushroom place in the ferry building (Far West Funghi) is excellent, I bought fresh morels there when I was home about a month ago. However, across the bay at the Monterey Produce Market, they have the most astounding mushroom selection I have ever seen. Easily 4x what FWF has and prices that are literally half as much. Fresh morels in SF were $50/lb, in Berkeley $25. And so on. It’s really amazing.

    In NYC, Eataly is probably the best and it’s good but expensive (duh) and the selection is limited by comparison. Westchester is surprisingly lame given how much money is up there.

  • Escoffier

    Liza, your “schtick” is to deny in your “discourse” all the cynical observations that the men make about women, and then confirm it all in what you choose to reveal about yourself.

    This is either an act, in which case it is expert trolling and bravo, hats off. Or it is how you really think, in which case …

  • “Marrying good is better than being single, divorced or marrying bad.”

    Anacaona,

    I totally agree with this statement.

    By the way, I find online debates to be quite tiresome, so I am going to wrap it up here.

  • Jimmy Hendricks

    I don’t really think it makes much difference whether one is at an Ivy, a large state school, a small private college, NYC, Michigan, Berkeley or Austin. The same things are going on everywhere.

    Agree 100%. One of the most interesting things I found on my travels to different schools was that the social scene at Notre Dame wasn’t much different than the social scene at Florida State. Obviously every place has its own characteristics, but most social scenes for young people are relatively similar.

  • By the way, I find online debates to be quite tiresome, so I am going to wrap it up here.

    ???? Why did you engaged on it in the first place? I feel like I got pumped and dumped without even having an orgasm myself…can you at least cuddle for five minutes before you leave? 😉

    • @Anacaona

      ???? Why did you engaged on it in the first place? I feel like I got pumped and dumped without even having an orgasm myself…can you at least cuddle for five minutes before you leave?

      This made me laugh so hard I cried. Definitely the funniest thing you’ve ever said!

  • @Susan @Escoffier

    Now I’m craving mushrooms, cheese, olives. I only have boring cheeses at home right now like Mozarella and Cheddar I will have to visit the delicatessen when I go shopping later on…Your fault! :p

  • Escoffier,

    Muah. I really want you too.

  • Escoffier

    The Cheese Board in Berkeley is hands down the best cheese store in the US. That whole Shattuck & Vine/Gourmet Ghetto area on the North Side is just fantastic across the board.

    Though NY is good for cheese, Zabar’s, Murray’s, Fairway, etc. The produce is where NY really lacks by comparison.

    • The produce is where NY really lacks by comparison.

      When I first moved to the East Coast, Haas avocados were not always available. Markets carried those terrible shiny Florida avocados. No comparison. I was bereft. Also, I once amazed a waiter in NY just by knowing exactly how to eat a stuffed artichoke. He said he’d never seen anyone dismantle it properly before. I grew up on those! On the other hand, I didn’t learn how to properly eat a lobster until I was 32.

      I grew up in a house surrounded by 9 orange trees. Fresh juice every morning. And the smell of orange blossoms! One whiff of that transports me to the back of Donny Emis’ motorbike every single time.

  • Escoffier

    Liza,

    xoxoxoxoxo

  • Oh Anacoana, I am sorry I withdraw prematurely. But you know how we players roll, once we hit it, we quit it. No, there were won’t be any cuddling but it was fun while it lasted, though. 😉

  • Anonymous

    Susan, I am a Gen-X and if I were asked these questions when I was in college or just graduated, my answers would be the same as these kids.

    When we’re young we’re very idealistic and think that we can have a job that has meaning and can save the world and we’ll fall in love/get married/have kids. As we age, we realize that some of those things are not going to happen so we start to want something else. They say the key to happiness is wanting what you have.

    • @Anonymous

      They say the key to happiness is wanting what you have.

      Wise words. Someone said recently that marriage is about waking up every morning and deciding to love and cherish the other person in the bed. I agree with that. It’s not really conscious, but I recommit every day.

  • Abbot

    “Tom is really a one-trick troll.”

    This Tom has a mission to make it seem like there are batteries of good men worth marrying lining up with catchers mitts gleefully waiting for played out foul balls [sexually expressed explored embraced women] to finally decide its time to land at home plate. If that were the case then all would be dandy for such women [he calls WOEs] but of course its not.

  • Oh Anacoana, I am sorry I withdraw prematurely. But you know how we players roll, once we hit it, we quit it. No, there were won’t be any cuddling but it was fun while it lasted, though.

    All HUS debaters are jerks…Where are all the good debaters! :D…Meh I’ll get a chatbot :p

  • Escoffier

    Abbot, I don’t think Tom actually asserts that these slut-catchers exist in droves. Rather, his schtick is to pop in and say that they SHOULD, that all of us who object to sluts should grow up, we are insecure, they are great women, partner count doesn’t matter. Tom, in other words, is a rear-guard enforcer of feminist orthodoxy.

  • Abbot

    “I don’t think Tom actually asserts that these slut-catchers exist in droves. Rather, his schtick is to pop in and say that they SHOULD, that all of us who object to sluts should grow up, we are insecure, they are great women, partner count doesn’t matter. Tom, in other words, is a rear-guard enforcer of feminist orthodoxy.”

    Then Tom is making statements that feminists want to say but don’t out of fear of appearing like grovelers to men. This sort of enforcer is what feminists need, that buffer who spews feminist buzzwords and tactics and yet projects the image of a burly man who knows best. Then there must be other Tom models out there on other blogs or maybe this is the beta test before the internet is carpet bombed with them.

  • @ Liza

    “I got that Kate Bolick was regretful about her choice but it is not like she cannot still get married. She obviously refuses to settle for less than what she wants. If she decided to settle she would be married, it is not that hard”

    Hahaha. It’s easy to rationalize it as such after the fact to try and cover over a mediocre life with a layer of new paint to make the best of it. You won’t fool anyone that knows the truth though. As such, these words started a song in my head, set to the tune of old “Johnny be good”

    Run hamster run run,
    Run hamster run run,
    Run hamster run run,
    Hamster be good.

    • @Leap of Beta

      I have it on good authority that Kate Bolick has received numerous marriage proposals since the Atlantic article. I predict she will marry, and marry well. I think she’ll even have a kid or two. Writing that article was brilliant self-promotion. In any case, she got a book deal for a million bucks.

      Her last two BF’s were 11 years younger than her. If she doesn’t marry, she can probably continue to pull younger guys for a while yet.

  • @ Susan
    “Most of my BU crew are teachers now, none of them are rich or likely to become rich.”

    Yeah? Are any of them prof’s at BU? My year of grad school in Boston was at BU. Who knows, might have run into them. I was a VERY different person that year though than who I am now.

    “A girl who lives in Boston, doesn’t work in theater, and enjoys life is bad news! I hope guys in Boston heed this warning! How is Emerson going to handle the hordes of young men descending on its theater craft department?”

    Lord, keep me away from the crazy Emerson girls. They have Issues, capitol I. Though they’re fun, I wouldn’t recommend them for anything other than a fun night. BU theatre girls are crazy, but they were more human. I wouldn’t know much of Harvard or Yalies, but their theatre productions certainly didn’t give them much credit.

    If you’re a college male, able to party on Thursday nights, and know theatre people at BU…. The parties they throw Thursday nights are the most intense they have – it’s their release for the weekend before rehearsals and long build days of Saturday and Sunday. Not much of a hookup scene, but it’ll be fun. Five dollars at the door gets you all the PBR and punch you can drink. Danger, danger Will Robinson, danger.

    • @Leap

      Yeah? Are any of them prof’s at BU? My year of grad school in Boston was at BU. Who knows, might have run into them. I was a VERY different person that year though than who I am now.

      No, most of them are elementary school teachers, BU class of ’10. Well done on your part btw – BU’s theater dept. is incredibly well regarded.

  • Sassy6519

    I though that was Sassy’s position? Everytime she mentions the kind of men she likes most men agree that she is the standard most men should imagine when dating out or get infuriated. But then I’m just a girl maybe I’m reading it wrong 😉

    I do what I can. 🙂

    With that, I’m off to theatre auditions.

    • @Sassy

      With that, I’m off to theatre auditions.

      You act? Have you talked about that before? Break a leg!

  • This made me laugh so hard I cried. Definitely the funniest thing you’ve ever said!

    Glad to be of service 😀

  • @ Susan
    “During my trip to Napa and SF last fall, I was amazed by the food quality. A whole store in the ferry terminal devoted to mushrooms!”

    There’s some good stuff in the Farmer’s markets once they start up. I went to one down in JP a few times. Usually I’d bike around the lake a bit, bike down to the market, and then back up to my apartment in Brookline.

    • @Leap

      Usually I’d bike around the lake a bit, bike down to the market, and then back up to my apartment in Brookline.

      That’s crazy, I walk around Jamaica Pond every weekend. It’s likely you rode right by me. Where in Brookline did you live? I’m in Pill Hill – very near the pond.

  • ExNewYorker

    @Susan,

    “We had the best picnic ever in Sonoma just be stopping by a local market for the best berries and fresh figs I’ve ever had.”

    I remember that…we were probably within a couple of miles you guys that day, and we had a similar picnic at one of the wineries in Sonoma.

    One of the great things of the SF Bay Area (besides the weather) really is the food. NYC is good too, but I was always too poor to buy the good stuff during my time there. In Boston, it was not as good but decent, but I was on a student budget there. It wasn’t till I was a full working STEM guy that I had the money to try some of this stuff out.

    The area you were visiting in Napa/Sonoma is really a good example of the northern California UMC (and above)…

    • @ENY

      The area you were visiting in Napa/Sonoma is really a good example of the northern California UMC (and above)…

      No sh*t. I felt like a slum dweller compared to some of the groups at the wineries. Mega bucks on display.

  • Richard Aubrey

    Excuse me? “Richard”?

    ’bout fourteen years ago, two girls of jr. hi age who lived in our neighborhood showed up at our door. When I opened to the knock, they just walked in. They sat down and talked for an hour and a half. It was heart-breaking. They were friends and each had had the same thing happen. Mom left for some stud. They even had to give up their beloved pets.
    ’bout five years ago, one called to ask if she could do a Kirby demo. Okay, but we’re not buying. Her situation was terrible. Living with some guy and his mother. Guy would get a GED if it became an issue. Challenged kid already on hand, ex gf duking it out over paternity of another. Offered to let her bunk in with us since it was late, the weather was bad and she had a long way to go. No, she said, and then, with a smile that makes me ill to recall it, she said, “He needs me.”
    Youi can, of course, think of how I think of her mother.
    Anyway, looked her up on Facebook yesterday. She seems to be doing great, talking in detail about her beloved hobby–which involves money so she has it, and travel, and trappings–and she’s employed by a good company and there was no mention of a guy.
    It’s possible to get past the bad stage, I suppose. Hope so. She was a neat kid when we knew her.
    My dtr played HS soccer. After the last game of a victorious season, they went to Pizza Hut where they were reproached for riotous conduct, although not exactly thrown out. Wish I’d been there.
    Then, at the team dinner, these young ladies dressed up pretty good. Different from seeing them with a warrior face, running like deer, covered in mud. Wondered whether such spit-in-your-eye beauties would avoid buttheads. After the discussion of what makes tingles, I figure probably not.
    Too bad.
    Since a tingle-inducer guy need not be one-tenth the quality of these women.
    A little swagger and some retail edge.
    Shit.

  • A Definite Beta Guy

    Even Tom has his limits on what he will accept

    What he is saying is don’t automatically disqualify women of High N.

    However, female promiscuity is an excellent indicator of mentally instability, lack of self-control, and selfishness. It also shows a lack of desire to commit.

    Look at the hard numbers, Gen Y is marrying less than any previous generation. If you’re looking for stability or a strong future from Gen Y, you are not going to get it.

    • Look at the hard numbers, Gen Y is marrying less than any previous generation. If you’re looking for stability or a strong future from Gen Y, you are not going to get it.

      It is way too early to say that. They’re barely at the average age for marriage.

  • @ Sassy

    “With that, I’m off to theatre auditions.”

    Break legs and let us know how it goes. What shows are you auditioning for, or is it seasonal/open audition deals?

  • I have it on good authority that Kate Bolick has received numerous marriage proposals since the Atlantic article. I predict she will marry, and marry well. I think she’ll even have a kid or two. Writing that article was brilliant self-promotion. In any case, she got a book deal for a million bucks.

    I think plenty of us called on that one. Just hope that her hamster doesn’t get in the way “If get marriage proposals for middle aged millionaires I should hot out for a hot younger billionaire like Christian Grey! I’m just in my best years!” Please God protect us all from the mighty hamster from hell.

    Contrary to what many people might believe I will be really happy if she still manages to get married. I just wish women and men don’t have to ever be on that position when they can do as good or better without having to run to it and get IVF or get frustrated month after month of period coming when you want to get pregnant (been there done that wouldn’t wish it on Amanda Marcotte) and of course I wouldn’t want guys having to find out their kids are not theirs, their wives with the plumber or coming home to an empty house and divorce papers on the floor ( I wouldn’t wish it on…I rather not tell ;))

    • @Anacaona

      (been there done that wouldn’t wish it on Amanda Marcotte)

      OMG, you are on a roll today.

      I think Bolick is likely to be extremely hypergamous. She wants a handsome, brilliant, successful man. If she pulls it off, I do not believe she would ever cuckold. Based on my admittedly brief encounter with her, I would vouch for her character. She hasn’t harmed anyone but herself.

  • @ Susan
    “No, most of them are elementary school teachers, BU class of ’10. Well done on your part btw – BU’s theater dept. is incredibly well regarded.”

    Ah ok. Wrong year and I didn’t interact very much with anyone at the school outside of the theatre department.

    And thanks. I was glad I got in, but got out after a year instead of three. They have a good program, but its far too…. New York City and North East for me. The theatre in that part of the country reflects a ton of the values and every day interactions of the people there.

    Give me the honest, dark, and gritty theatre here in Chicago over that any day.

    • @Leap

      Give me the honest, dark, and gritty theatre here in Chicago over that any day.

      Good for you, I respect that. It isn’t easy to walk away from prestige even when it’s not right for you. How many guys have chased Wall St. careers even though they don’t enjoy the work?

      I’m especially aware of the Chicago comedy scene. Any chance you’ll work with some of those folks? Or do they not use sets?

  • @ Ana
    “Contrary to what many people might believe I will be really happy if she still manages to get married.”

    I’d be very happy if she got married as long as she doesn’t advocate her approach as a great strategy for most women. She’s in the top 1% in that she’s been successful in her career and has retained her physical looks much better than most women at her age. If she comes off as a role model instead of a warning sign with a wringing of hands and sigh of relief at the end, then she’s doing women a great disservice.

    • I’d be very happy if she got married as long as she doesn’t advocate her approach as a great strategy for most women.

      Cosign. Kate Bolick is going to pull a rabbit out of a hat.

  • ExNewYorker

    @Susan

    “No sh*t. I felt like a slum dweller compared to some of the groups at the wineries. Mega bucks on display.”

    *Laugh* We were staying at a cabin owned by a couple that we’re friends with, who were well off before one of them joined Google pre-ipo, so yeah, I can relate.

    The northern California rich seem to be generally less overtly ostentatious than their counterparts down in the LA area.

    • @ENY

      Yeah, I’d be willing to bet the groups of couples who arrived in limos were all from the south 😛

  • @ Susan

    Thanks. It was hard due to what I knew friends, family, and most of all the people at BU would think (didn’t want to burn bridges) but when I was honest with myself, there wasn’t really a choice. Even though I was getting a 3.85 GPA, I was miserable and everyone could see it was a bad fit.

    As for the comedy scene here in Chicago, it’s not likely. The best stand up involves not having a set or props – basically not having any limitations on the actors’ imaginations and abilities. That being said, I have friends that are involved in classes at the Improv Olympics and Second City – they’re trying to get in. And even though I don’t technically need it, every time a bar tending position in either opens up, I toss my resume in simply because it’d be a blast to work a couple nights a week there for some extra cash, some fun, and meeting cool people.

    Flirting with women that are trained to ‘follow their impulses’ makes no part of that decision. No, none at all…. Nothing to see here, move along citizen…

    • Flirting with women that are trained to ‘follow their impulses’ makes no part of that decision. No, none at all…. Nothing to see here, move along citizen…

      LOL! I agree, I think bartending at Second City would be a blast. So much talent on display – even the hopefuls are amazing.

  • Abbot

    Yawn, another rah rah self-reinforcement article

    http://www.marieclaire.com/sex-love/single-girl-trend

    Trend…more like a fad.

  • SayWhaat

    I believe they schedule a big work day, e.g. a Saturday at Habitat for Humanity or a shelter, and then at the end of the day they go out for beers together. I think that would be a great way of meeting new people. I’m sure other cities have this as well.

    I just attended a wedding this past weekend between an Irish-American groom and an Indian-American bride. They met building a house for Habitat for Humanity in India. 🙂

  • OMG, you are on a roll today.

    Interesting I had been upset for a couple of days now (big fight with my so called best friend from DR that might end the friendship I’m a text message away from erasing her as sister from Facebook) maybe being upset makes me funnier. I usually try to be on a Zen state when I write, but who knows if this feeling in the pit of my stomach as good applications…off to rewrite after I eat some Gouda cheese sandwich with pear juice.

  • Hahaha. It’s easy to rationalize it as such after the fact to try and cover over a mediocre life with a layer of new paint to make the best of it. You won’t fool anyone that knows the truth though. As such, these words started a song in my head, set to the tune of old “Johnny be good”

    Run hamster run run,
    Run hamster run run,
    Run hamster run run,
    Hamster be good.
    ——–
    Leap of A Beta,

    Your comments addressed to me always make me laugh, that is why I usually don’t respond to them–too busy laughing. And, this comment is really hysterical so…

  • @ Lisa
    Hahaha. I have a dark, jaded sense of humor. I’m glad you appreciated it. The song made me laugh as soon as it entered my head too.

    If only I was more like the stereotypical hipster and played acoustic guitar, I’d write full satirical lyrics to that, play it on youtube, and be an instant hit on the blogosphere. Alas, someone else will have to follow my dreams.

    But the laughter helped, as I was in the middle of writing the newest post on my own blog. I needed the occasional laugh that this and the part where I linked Monty Python in the new post to relate it to women in today’s SMV.

    I win via Monty Python.

  • I win via Monty Python.

    Monty Python!!! Of to your blog! 🙂

  • I needed the occasional laugh that this and the part where I linked Monty Python in the new post to relate it to women in today’s SMV.

    LOAB,

    Oh, yes, appreciate dark humor. Mony Python rules.

    I wonder if anyone in particular inspired that upcoming post. Yes, I am kind of making it about me. I just know it is going to be brutal but I cannot wait to read it. *laughing as I type*

  • @SW

    No sh*t. I felt like a slum dweller compared to some of the groups at the wineries. Mega bucks on display.

    A lot of those yuppies live in Marin County. There are plenty of middle-class folks making a living in between the vineyards out here. We just frequent the local breweries instead : )

  • @ Liza and Ana
    Haha, I hope you enjoy it

    No. It actually hasn’t been inspired by anyone here unless it was done so additionally by my subconscious. I’ve been reading a great deal of psychology on the development of co-dependency issues while also reading “The Game” after Obsidian’s urging to do so.

    If you really feel like digging into it, I link to all the relevant personal experiences, thoughts, and posts I’ve been reading and commenting on at the top of this latest post before I even dig into it myself.

  • Haha, I hope you enjoy it

    Shrubbery is a classic (had you played Flux? There is a Monthy Python edition really cool and has shrubbery on it) I never though it was a good metaphor for the SMP. Good connection! 🙂

  • @ Ana

    Nah, never played Flux. Sounds familiar though.

    I actually surprised myself with the connection. I didn’t have it until I was trying to think of a title for that section of the post. It’s why I love writing a blog and in comments – doing so drastically helps expand my mind and my modes of thinking.

  • Off topic from what we’ve been discussing, but I just read the Keegan article you linked in passing Susan.

    http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2012/may/27/keegan-opposite-loneliness/

    Seems to me the word she was looking for was a community to belong to. Roots to put in and a place to grow.

    On top of the accident, its sad to me that this was something that wasn’t immediately apparent. Through out human history it seems like we’ve always known the value of community and belonging to a group of individuals you could relate to and see in person on a daily basis. Even being a 26 year old in theatre that’s moved four times since graduating, I knew I needed this to feel happy and content. It’s disturbing she, and I imagine many other young adults, didn’t even know what they were looking for.

    No wonder the SMV is so fucked up in that kind of ignorance of self, belonging, and content. Without that information and with mainstream media constantly yelling in your ear, how can anyone make choices that would lead to happiness?

  • @Leap of a Beta
    Is a card’s game http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluxx actually it works as a metaphor for the SMP too since its appeal is that they have rule changing cards so if you have a card that tells you “You need ten x to win” someone could get another card on top of it “You need Card X to win” and change it when you are almost winning, it sounds frustrating but is really fun you can also win the jackpot by both landing the card that will help you win and winning right away. The SMP wishes it was this fun. 🙂

    • Since Monty Python has been mentioned, it doesn’t seem too OT to post this recent post by John Cleese. V. funny:

      ALERTS TO THREATS IN 2012 EUROPE

      By John Cleese (British writer, actor and tall person):

      The English are feeling the pinch in relation to recent events in Syria and have therefore raised their security level from “Miffed” to “Peeved.” Soon, though, security levels may be raised yet again to “Irritated” or even “A Bit Cross.” The English have not been “A Bit Cross” since the blitz in 1940 when tea supplies nearly ran out. Terrorists have been re-categorized from “Tiresome” to “A Bloody Nuisance.” The last time the British issued a “Bloody Nuisance” warning level was in 1588, when threatened by the Spanish Armada.

      The Scots have raised their threat level from “Pissed Off” to “Let’s get the Bastards.” They don’t have any other levels. This is the reason they have been used on the front line of the British army for the last 300 years.

      The French government announced yesterday that it has raised its terror alert level from “Run” to “Hide.” The only two higher levels in France are “Collaborate” and “Surrender.” The rise was precipitated by a recent fire that destroyed France ‘s white flag factory, effectively paralyzing the country’s military capability.

      Italy has increased the alert level from “Shout Loudly and Excitedly” to “Elaborate Military Posturing.” Two more levels remain: “Ineffective Combat Operations” and “Change Sides.”

      The Germans have increased their alert state from “Disdainful Arrogance” to “Dress in Uniform and Sing Marching Songs.” They also have two higher levels: “Invade a Neighbour” and “Lose.”

      Belgians, on the other hand, are all on holiday as usual; the only threat they are worried about is NATO pulling out of Brussels .

      The Spanish are all excited to see their new submarines ready to deploy. These beautifully designed subs have glass bottoms so the new Spanish navy can get a really good look at the old Spanish navy.

      Australia , meanwhile, has raised its security level from “No worries” to “She’ll be alright, Mate.” Two more escalation levels remain: “Crikey! I think we’ll need to cancel the barbie this weekend!” and “The barbie is cancelled.” So far no situation has ever warranted use of the last final escalation level.

      — John Cleese – British writer, actor and tall person
      A final thought -” Greece is collapsing, the Iranians are getting aggressive, and Rome is in disarray. Welcome back to 430 BC.”

  • @Liza207

    You’re cool with me, kid. I do not view you as a troll, no way.
    —–
    Susan,

    You have always been cool with me, too. Your dedication should be commended because I don’t think I could deal. More power to you, girl.

  • @Leap of a Beta

    Thought provoking post. You have a very interesting writing style. I like it.

    Later.

  • @ Ana
    OH! I have played Flux! It’s just been a year since I played it – I last played it in Boston. I played the Stoner Fluxx and Zombie Fluxx versions. For some reason my mind was going to some other card game… The one you all raid a dungeon but also back stab each other. I can’t remember the name of it.

    @ Liza
    Thanks for the compliment. Drop by the blog any time.

  • Susan. Thank you. I was laughing the whole time.

  • @Ana

    Had you played Flux?

    Uh oh, looks like Cthulhu Fluxx is coming…
    http://www.looneylabs.com/
    If anything can destroy the hookup scene, it’s the Great Old Ones : )

    Chrononauts (same company) is a lot of fun, too.

  • @Susan
    That was hilarious! 😀
    Linking to the hubby,thanks we have an unofficial game of “who links the other to the best/funniest/shocking post of the day” from our dating days and I think I win the week for this one. So thanks! 😀

    Talking about funny findings…

    Looking for publishing houses to query my almost positively finished Romance book I found that someone launched a line for men. This is some of the requirements:
    *Realistic wording and dialogue for male characters (not the language women WISH men spoke); this extends to the male narrative.
    *More of what men want or need from women: sex, love, acceptance, admiration, dirty talk; less of what they don’t need (judgment, drama, expectation of anticipating woman’s needs)
    *Women taking the initiative during sex
    *Remember that sex is largely visual and verbal for men (for women, it is mainly mental and emotional). Men polled preferred “real women” (natural as opposed to surgically enhanced) and wanted women to “do some of the work”. Interpret that as you will!

    Is the dawn of a new age. 😉
    I don’t particularly like Erotica but I will try to read one of this aimed to men books, too curious for my own good.

  • Uh oh, looks like Cthulhu Fluxx is coming…

    Birthday present for the hubby found! Hubby is a HUGE Lovecraft fan, so much that the has a Baby’s first Mythos http://www.amazon.com/Babys-First-Mythos-C-Henderson/dp/193174825X somewhere in the house (He hide it from me because I threatened to burn it before he terrorize our kids with it, I’m joking…maybe). Thanks! 😀

  • …so much that the has a Baby’s first Mythos

    My God… and I thought I was offbeat, with my Patrick McGoohan Prisoner memorabilia.

  • My God… and I thought I was offbeat, with my Patrick McGoohan Prisoner memorabilia.

    Heh hubby and I are sort of the interracial poor Adam’s family I can tell you poor kids are whether being amazing or amazingly traumatized 😉

  • there is something troubling when 25% of the Yale class goes racing off to McKinsey, Bain and Wall St. I know that Harvard University has voiced similar concerns about the choices its graduates make coming out of school.

    What’s more troubling is that McKinsey, Bain and Wall St. et al don’t seem to be looking for new hires from schools outside of the Ivy League (if your 25% stat is accurate). Maybe that’s all the trust fund kids know how to do — Big Finance and Big Altruism. There are a zillion schools out there now, many with great econ/statistics/finance/business departments. I’m sure they’d love to see 25% of their classes be so fortunate.

  • Ramble

    The Scots have raised their threat level from “Pissed Off” to “Let’s get the Bastards.” They don’t have any other levels. This is the reason they have been used on the front line of the British army for the last 300 years.

    As someone of Scottish heritage, I find this both humorous, and offensive, at the same time. Good Stuff.

    When elections roll around, there is always this one to enjoy:

    To the citizens of the United States of America, in light of your failure to elect a competent President of the USA and thus to govern yourselves, we hereby give notice of the revocation of your independence, effective today.

    Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II resumes monarchical duties over all states, commonwealths and other territories. Except Utah, which she does not fancy.

    Your new prime minister (The Right Honourable Tony Blair, MP for the 97.8% of you who have, until now, been unaware there’s a world outside your borders) will appoint a Minister for America. Congress and the Senate are disbanded. A questionnaire circulated next year will determine whether any of you noticed.

    To aid your transition to a British Crown Dependency, the following rules are introduced with immediate effect:

    1. Look up “revocation” in the Oxford English Dictionary. Check “aluminium” in the pronunciation guide. You will be amazed at just how wrongly you pronounce it. The letter ‘U’ will be reinstated in words such as ‘favour’ and ‘neighbour’. Likewise you will learn to spell ‘doughnut’ without skipping half the letters. Generally, you should raise your vocabulary to acceptable levels. Look up “vocabulary.”

    Using the same twenty seven words interspersed with filler noises such as “like” and “you know” is an unacceptable and inefficient form of communication. Look up “interspersed.” There will be no more ‘bleeps’ in the Jerry Springer show. If you’re not old enough to cope with bad language then you should not have chat shows.

    2. There is no such thing as “U.S. English.” We’ll let Microsoft know on your behalf. The Microsoft spell-checker will be adjusted to take account of the reinstated letter ‘u’.

    3. You should learn to distinguish English and Australian accents. It really isn’t that hard. English accents are not limited to cockney, upper-class twit or Mancunian (Daphne in Frasier). Scottish dramas such as ‘Taggart’ will no longer be broadcast with subtitles.You must learn that there is no such place as Devonshire in England. The name of the county is “Devon.” If you persist in calling it Devonshire, all American States will become “shires” e.g. Texasshire Floridashire, Louisianashire.

    4. You should relearn your original national anthem, “God Save The Queen”, but only after fully carrying out task 1.

    5. You should stop playing American “football.” There’s only one kind of football. What you call American “football” is not a very good game. The 2.1% of you aware there is a world outside your borders may have noticed no one else plays “American” football. You should instead play proper football. Initially, it would be best if you played with the girls.

    Those of you brave enough will, in time, be allowed to play rugby (which is similar to American “football”, but does not involve stopping for a rest every twenty seconds or wearing full kevlar body armour like nancies).

    You should stop playing baseball. It’s not reasonable to host an event called the ‘World Series’ for a game which is not played outside of America. Instead of baseball, you will be allowed to play a girls’ game called “rounders,” which is baseball without fancy team stripe, oversized gloves, collector cards or hotdogs.

    6. You will no longer be allowed to own or carry guns, or anything more dangerous in public than a vegetable peeler. Because you are not sensible enough to handle potentially dangerous items, you need a permit to carry a vegetable peeler.

    7. July 4th is no longer a public holiday. November 2nd will be a new national holiday. It will be called “Indecisive Day.”

    8. All American cars are hereby banned. They are crap and it is for your own good. When we show you German cars, you will understand what we mean. All road intersections will be replaced with roundabouts, and you will start driving on the left. At the same time, you will go metric without the benefit of conversion tables. Roundabouts and metrication will help you understand the British sense of humour.

    9. Learn to make real chips. Those things you call French fries are not real chips. Fries aren’t French, they’re Belgian though 97.8% of you (including the guy who discovered fries while in Europe) are not aware of a country called Belgium. Potato chips are properly called “crisps.” Real chips are thick cut and fried in animal fat. The traditional accompaniment to chips is beer which should be served warm and flat.

    10. The cold tasteless stuff you call beer is actually lager. Only proper British Bitter will be referred to as “beer.” Substances once known as “American Beer” will henceforth be referred to as “Near-Frozen Gnat’s Urine,” except for the product of the American Budweiser company which will be called “Weak Near-Frozen Gnat’s Urine.” This will allow true Budweiser (as manufactured for the last 1000 years in Pilsen, Czech Republic) to be sold without risk of confusion.

    11. The UK will harmonise petrol prices (or “Gasoline,” as you will be permitted to keep calling it) for those of the former USA, adopting UK petrol prices (roughly $6/US gallon, get used to it).

    12. Learn to resolve personal issues without guns, lawyers or therapists. That you need many lawyers and therapists shows you’re not adult enough to be independent. If you’re not adult enough to sort things out without suing someone or speaking to a therapist, you’re not grown up enough to handle a gun.

    13. Please tell us who killed JFK. It’s been driving us crazy.

    14. Tax collectors from Her Majesty’s Government will be with you shortly to ensure the acquisition of all revenues due (backdated to 1776).

    Thank you for your co-operation.

    * John Cleese
    [Basil Fawlty, Fawlty Towers, Torquay, Devon, England]

    BTW, it is unlikely that John Cleese wrote this, but, it is more fun to think that he did.

    (Yes, I know that Tony Blair is no longer Prime Minister, but I could not find a more recent one and I did not care to change it.)

    • @Ramble

      That’s hilarious. Fawlty Towers is one of my favourite TV experiences ever.

  • Ramble

    12 Episodes.

    Twelve Fucking Episodes!

    Amazing.

    • @Ramble

      I’ve read that of all his work, Cleese is proudest of Fawlty Towers. The writing is razor sharp, and the physical comedy is brilliant.

  • Ella

    ”I believe happiness is a state of mind not something that can achieved or received through external means or something giving it to you. Sure, sharing my life with someone who really cared about me would definitely enhance my life but expecting them to make me happy because I am not already is a definite recipe for disaster.”

    I agree with the part of not expecting someone else to make you happy, but that a lot different than being single is the same as being married. We are social creatures and even if we can survive and do good alone and we thrive on couple hood.Thanks for sharing